0 麻将游戏大全-APP安装下载

麻将游戏大全 注册最新版下载

麻将游戏大全 注册

麻将游戏大全注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:泽利·萨宾 大小:z0bPuk6w27594KB 下载:CaqdpC7K79339次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:IeHnVXDb18567条
日期:2020-08-05 19:03:03
安卓
刘玉栋

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Menelaus overheard him and said, "No one, my sons, can hold hisown with Jove, for his house and everything about him is immortal; butamong mortal men- well, there may be another who has as much wealth asI have, or there may not; but at all events I have travelled muchand have undergone much hardship, for it was nearly eight years beforeI could get home with my fleet. I went to Cyprus, Phoenicia and theEgyptians; I went also to the Ethiopians, the Sidonians, and theErembians, and to Libya where the lambs have horns as soon as they areborn, and the sheep lamb down three times a year. Every one in thatcountry, whether master or man, has plenty of cheese, meat, and goodmilk, for the ewes yield all the year round. But while I wastravelling and getting great riches among these people, my brother wassecretly and shockingly murdered through the perfidy of his wickedwife, so that I have no pleasure in being lord of all this wealth.Whoever your parents may be they must have told you about all this,and of my heavy loss in the ruin of a stately mansion fully andmagnificently furnished. Would that I had only a third of what I nowhave so that I had stayed at home, and all those were living whoperished on the plain of Troy, far from Argos. I of grieve, as I sithere in my house, for one and all of them. At times I cry aloud forsorrow, but presently I leave off again, for crying is cold comfortand one soon tires of it. Yet grieve for these as I may, I do so forone man more than for them all. I cannot even think of him withoutloathing both food and sleep, so miserable does he make me, for no oneof all the Achaeans worked so hard or risked so much as he did. Hetook nothing by it, and has left a legacy of sorrow to myself, forhe has been gone a long time, and we know not whether he is alive ordead. His old father, his long-suffering wife Penelope, and his sonTelemachus, whom he left behind him an infant in arms, are plungedin grief on his account."
2.  "'I will do so gladly,' answered she, 'if you men will first swearme a solemn oath that you will do me no harm by the way.'
3.  Laertes' strength failed him when he heard the convincing proofswhich his son had given him. He threw his arms about him, andUlysses had to support him, or he would have gone off into a swoon;but as soon as he came to, and was beginning to recover his senses, hesaid, "O father Jove, then you gods are still in Olympus after all, ifthe suitors have really been punished for their insolence and folly.Nevertheless, I am much afraid that I shall have all the townspeopleof Ithaca up here directly, and they will be sending messengerseverywhere throughout the cities of the Cephallenians."
4.  It was not long ere Penelope came to know what the suitors wereplotting; for a man servant, Medon, overheard them from outside theouter court as they were laying their schemes within, and went to tellhis mistress. As he crossed the threshold of her room Penelope said:"Medon, what have the suitors sent you here for? Is it to tell themaids to leave their master's business and cook dinner for them? Iwish they may neither woo nor dine henceforward, neither here noranywhere else, but let this be the very last time, for the waste youall make of my son's estate. Did not your fathers tell you when youwere children how good Ulysses had been to them- never doinganything high-handed, nor speaking harshly to anybody? Kings may saythings sometimes, and they may take a fancy to one man and dislikeanother, but Ulysses never did an unjust thing by anybody- which showswhat bad hearts you have, and that there is no such thing as gratitudeleft in this world."
5.  Eumaeus answered, "Old man, no traveller who comes here with newswill get Ulysses' wife and son to believe his story. Nevertheless,tramps in want of a lodging keep coming with their mouths full oflies, and not a word of truth; every one who finds his way to Ithacagoes to my mistress and tells her falsehoods, whereon she takes themin, makes much of them, and asks them all manner of questions,crying all the time as women will when they have lost theirhusbands. And you too, old man, for a shirt and a cloak woulddoubtless make up a very pretty story. But the wolves and birds ofprey have long since torn Ulysses to pieces, or the fishes of thesea have eaten him, and his bones are lying buried deep in sand uponsome foreign shore; he is dead and gone, and a bad business it isfor all his friends- for me especially; go where I may I shall neverfind so good a master, not even if I were to go home to my motherand father where I was bred and born. I do not so much care,however, about my parents now, though I should dearly like to see themagain in my own country; it is the loss of Ulysses that grieves memost; I cannot speak of him without reverence though he is here nolonger, for he was very fond of me, and took such care of me thatwhereever he may be I shall always honour his memory."
6.  "I am by birth a Cretan; my father was a well-to-do man, who hadmany sons born in marriage, whereas I was the son of a slave whom hehad purchased for a concubine; nevertheless, my father Castor son ofHylax (whose lineage I claim, and who was held in the highest honouramong the Cretans for his wealth, prosperity, and the valour of hissons) put me on the same level with my brothers who had been born inwedlock. When, however, death took him to the house of Hades, his sonsdivided his estate and cast lots for their shares, but to me they gavea holding and little else; nevertheless, my valour enabled me to marryinto a rich family, for I was not given to bragging, or shirking onthe field of battle. It is all over now; still, if you look at thestraw you can see what the ear was, for I have had trouble enoughand to spare. Mars and Minerva made me doughty in war; when I hadpicked my men to surprise the enemy with an ambuscade I never gavedeath so much as a thought, but was the first to leap forward andspear all whom I could overtake. Such was I in battle, but I did notcare about farm work, nor the frugal home life of those who wouldbring up children. My delight was in ships, fighting, javelins, andarrows- things that most men shudder to think of; but one man likesone thing and another another, and this was what I was mostnaturally inclined to. Before the Achaeans went to Troy, nine timeswas I in command of men and ships on foreign service, and I amassedmuch wealth. I had my pick of the spoil in the first instance, andmuch more was allotted to me later on.

计划指导

1.  "Here she ended, and dawn enthroned in gold began to show in heaven,whereon she returned inland. I then went on board and told my men toloose the ship from her moorings; so they at once got into her, tooktheir places, and began to smite the grey sea with their oars.Presently the great and cunning goddess Circe befriended us with afair wind that blew dead aft, and stayed steadily with us, keeping oursails well filled, so we did whatever wanted doing to the ship's gear,and let her go as wind and helmsman headed her.
2.  "My mother," answered Telemachus, tells me I am son to Ulysses,but it is a wise child that knows his own father. Would that I wereson to one who had grown old upon his own estates, for, since youask me, there is no more ill-starred man under heaven than he who theytell me is my father."
3.  Thus conversing the two made their way towards the house. Whenthey got there they found Telemachus with the stockman and theswineherd cutting up meat and mixing wine with water. Then the oldSicel woman took Laertes inside and washed him and anointed him withoil. She put him on a good cloak, and Minerva came up to him andgave him a more imposing presence, making him taller and stouterthan before. When he came back his son was surprised to see himlooking so like an immortal, and said to him, "My dear father, someone of the gods has been making you much taller and better-looking."
4.  Then the swineherd and the stockman left the cloisters together, andUlysses followed them. When they had got outside the gates and theouter yard, Ulysses said to them quietly:
5.  The others applauded what Antinous had said, and each one sent hisservant to bring his present. Antinous's man returned with a large andlovely dress most exquisitely embroidered. It had twelve beautifullymade brooch pins of pure gold with which to fasten it. Eurymachusimmediately brought her a magnificent chain of gold and amber beadsthat gleamed like sunlight. Eurydamas's two men returned with someearrings fashioned into three brilliant pendants which glistenedmost beautifully; while king Pisander son of Polyctor gave her anecklace of the rarest workmanship, and every one else brought her abeautiful present of some kind.
6.  "After her I saw Iphimedeia wife of Aloeus who boasted the embraceof Neptune. She bore two sons Otus and Ephialtes, but both wereshort lived. They were the finest children that were ever born in thisworld, and the best looking, Orion only excepted; for at nine yearsold they were nine fathoms high, and measured nine cubits round thechest. They threatened to make war with the gods in Olympus, and triedto set Mount Ossa on the top of Mount Olympus, and Mount Pelion on thetop of Ossa, that they might scale heaven itself, and they wouldhave done it too if they had been grown up, but Apollo, son of Leto,killed both of them, before they had got so much as a sign of hairupon their cheeks or chin.

推荐功能

1.  "Hear me," said he, "aldermen and town councillors of thePhaeacians, that I may speak even as I am minded. This stranger,whoever he may be, has found his way to my house from somewhere orother either East or West. He wants an escort and wishes to have thematter settled. Let us then get one ready for him, as we have done forothers before him; indeed, no one who ever yet came to my house hasbeen able to complain of me for not speeding on his way soon enough.Let us draw a ship into the sea- one that has never yet made a voyage-and man her with two and fifty of our smartest young sailors. Thenwhen you have made fast your oars each by his own seat, leave the shipand come to my house to prepare a feast. I will find you ineverything. I am giving will these instructions to the young men whowill form the crew, for as regards you aldermen and towncouncillors, you will join me in entertaining our guest in thecloisters. I can take no excuses, and we will have Demodocus to singto us; for there is no bard like him whatever he may choose to singabout."
2.  "Eumaeus, I hear footsteps; I suppose one of your men or some one ofyour acquaintance is coming here, for the dogs are fawning urn him andnot barking."
3.  At this moment the bow was in the hands of Eurymachus, who waswarming it by the fire, but even so he could not string it, and he wasgreatly grieved. He heaved a deep sigh and said, "I grieve formyself and for us all; I grieve that I shall have to forgo themarriage, but I do not care nearly so much about this, for there areplenty of other women in Ithaca and elsewhere; what I feel most is thefact of our being so inferior to Ulysses in strength that we cannotstring his bow. This will disgrace us in the eyes of those who are yetunborn."
4.  Ulysses hailed this as of good omen, and Antinous set a great goat'spaunch before him filled with blood and fat. Amphinomus took twoloaves out of the bread-basket and brought them to him, pledging himas he did so in a golden goblet of wine. "Good luck to you," hesaid, "father stranger, you are very badly off at present, but Ihope you will have better times by and by."
5.   Phemius was still singing, and his hearers sat rapt in silence as hetold the sad tale of the return from Troy, and the ills Minerva hadlaid upon the Achaeans. Penelope, daughter of Icarius, heard hissong from her room upstairs, and came down by the great staircase, notalone, but attended by two of her handmaids. When she reached thesuitors she stood by one of the bearing posts that supported theroof of the cloisters with a staid maiden on either side of her. Sheheld a veil, moreover, before her face, and was weeping bitterly.
6.  "Now to this place there came some cunning traders from Phoenicia(for the Phoenicians are great mariners) in a ship which they hadfreighted with gewgaws of all kinds. There happened to be a Phoenicianwoman in my father's house, very tall and comely, and an excellentservant; these scoundrels got hold of her one day when she was washingnear their ship, seduced her, and cajoled her in ways that no womancan resist, no matter how good she may be by nature. The man who hadseduced her asked her who she was and where she came from, and onthis she told him her father's name. 'I come from Sidon,' said she,'and am daughter to Arybas, a man rolling in wealth. One day as Iwas coming into the town from the country some Taphian piratesseized me and took me here over the sea, where they sold me to the manwho owns this house, and he gave them their price for me.'

应用

1.  "I also saw Maera and Clymene and hateful Eriphyle, who sold her ownhusband for gold. But it would take me all night if I were to nameevery single one of the wives and daughters of heroes whom I saw,and it is time for me to go to bed, either on board ship with my crew,or here. As for my escort, heaven and yourselves will see to it."
2.  "What an exquisitely delicious sleep I have been having," saidshe, as she passed her hands over her face, "in spite of all mymisery. I wish Diana would let me die so sweetly now at this verymoment, that I might no longer waste in despair for the loss of mydear husband, who possessed every kind of good quality and was themost distinguished man among the Achaeans."
3.  "He got more and more furious as he heard me, so he tore the topfrom off a high mountain, and flung it just in front of my ship sothat it was within a little of hitting the end of the rudder. Thesea quaked as the rock fell into it, and the wash of the wave itraised carried us back towards the mainland, and forced us towards theshore. But I snatched up a long pole and kept the ship off, makingsigns to my men by nodding my head, that they must row for theirlives, whereon they laid out with a will. When we had got twice as faras we were before, I was for jeering at the Cyclops again, but the menbegged and prayed of me to hold my tongue.
4、  "Your discretion, my friend," answered Menelaus, "is beyond youryears. It is plain you take after your father. One can soon see when aman is son to one whom heaven has blessed both as regards wife andoffspring- and it has blessed Nestor from first to last all hisdays, giving him a green old age in his own house, with sons about himwho are both we disposed and valiant. We will put an end thereforeto all this weeping, and attend to our supper again. Let water bepoured over our hands. Telemachus and I can talk with one anotherfully in the morning."
5、  On this the old woman went out of the room to bid the maids go totheir mistress. In the meantime Minerva bethought her of anothermatter, and sent Penelope off into a sweet slumber; so she lay down onher couch and her limbs became heavy with sleep. Then the goddess shedgrace and beauty over her that all the Achaeans might admire her.She washed her face with the ambrosial loveliness that Venus wearswhen she goes dancing with the Graces; she made her taller and of amore commanding figure, while as for her complexion it was whiter thansawn ivory. When Minerva had done all this she went away, whereonthe maids came in from the women's room and woke Penelope with thesound of their talking.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(PMNbnbu294473))

  • 丑萌 08-04

      Then Ulysses said to Telemachus, "Call nurse Euryclea; I havesomething to say to her."

  • 郭军鸽 08-04

      "She is still at the house," replied Eumaeus, "grieving and breakingher heart, and doing nothing but weep, both night and daycontinually."

  • 谌玲 08-04

       "And now for yourself- stay here some ten or twelve days longer, andI will then speed you on your way. I will make you a noble presentof a chariot and three horses. I will also give you a beautifulchalice that so long as you live you may think of me whenever you makea drink-offering to the immortal gods."

  • 贝利 08-04

      "And a pretty figure I should cut then," replied Eumaeus, both nowand hereafter, if I were to kill you after receiving you into my hutand showing you hospitality. I should have to say my prayers in goodearnest if I did; but it is just supper time and I hope my men willcome in directly, that we may cook something savoury for supper."

  • 冉庙 08-03

    {  A servant presently led in the famous bard Demodocus, whom themuse had dearly loved, but to whom she had given both good and evil,for though she had endowed him with a divine gift of song, she hadrobbed him of his eyesight. Pontonous set a seat for him among theguests, leaning it up against a bearing-post. He hung the lyre for himon a peg over his head, and showed him where he was to feel for itwith his hands. He also set a fair table with a basket of victualsby his side, and a cup of wine from which he might drink whenever hewas so disposed.

  • 屠格涅夫 08-02

      As he spoke he handed her the cup. Minerva thought it very right andproper of him to have given it to herself first; she accordingly beganpraying heartily to Neptune. "O thou," she cried, "that encirclest theearth, vouchsafe to grant the prayers of thy servants that call uponthee. More especially we pray thee send down thy grace on Nestor andon his sons; thereafter also make the rest of the Pylian people somehandsome return for the goodly hecatomb they are offering you. Lastly,grant Telemachus and myself a happy issue, in respect of the matterthat has brought us in our to Pylos."}

  • 鲁浙冀 08-02

      "And I saw Leda the wife of Tyndarus, who bore him two famoussons, Castor breaker of horses, and Pollux the mighty boxer. Boththese heroes are lying under the earth, though they are still alive,for by a special dispensation of Jove, they die and come to lifeagain, each one of them every other day throughout all time, andthey have the rank of gods.

  • 代罗特 08-02

      "The thing shall be done," exclaimed Alcinous, "as surely as I stilllive and reign over the Phaeacians. Our guest is indeed very anxiousto get home, still we must persuade him to remain with us untilto-morrow, by which time I shall be able to get together the whole sumthat I mean to give him. As regards- his escort it will be a matterfor you all, and mine above all others as the chief person among you."

  • 杨小兰 08-01

       "Madam;" answered Ulysses, "who on the face of the whole earth candare to chide with you? Your fame reaches the firmament of heavenitself; you are like some blameless king, who upholds righteousness,as the monarch over a great and valiant nation: the earth yields itswheat and barley, the trees are loaded with fruit, the ewes bringforth lambs, and the sea abounds with fish by reason of his virtues,and his people do good deeds under him. Nevertheless, as I sit here inyour house, ask me some other question and do not seek to know my raceand family, or you will recall memories that will yet more increase mysorrow. I am full of heaviness, but I ought not to sit weeping andwailing in another person's house, nor is it well to be thusgrieving continually. I shall have one of the servants or evenyourself complaining of me, and saying that my eyes swim with tearsbecause I am heavy with wine."

  • 吉姆·帕森斯 07-30

    {  "These two," continued Ulysses, "will not keep long out of the fray,when the suitors and we join fight in my house. Now, therefore, returnhome early to-morrow morning, and go about among the suitors asbefore. Later on the swineherd will bring me to the city disguisedas a miserable old beggar. If you see them ill-treating me, steel yourheart against my sufferings; even though they drag me feet foremostout of the house, or throw things at me, look on and do nothing beyondgently trying to make them behave more reasonably; but they will notlisten to you, for the day of their reckoning is at hand.Furthermore I say, and lay my saying to your heart, when Minerva shallput it in my mind, I will nod my head to you, and on seeing me do thisyou must collect all the armour that is in the house and hide it inthe strong store room. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you whyyou are removing it; say that you have taken it to be out of the wayof the smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysseswent away, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to thismore particularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on toquarrel over their wine, and that they may do each other some harmwhich may disgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of armssometimes tempts people to use them. But leave a sword and a spearapiece for yourself and me, and a couple oxhide shields so that we cansnatch them up at any moment; Jove and Minerva will then soon quietthese people. There is also another matter; if you are indeed my sonand my blood runs in your veins, let no one know that Ulysses iswithin the house- neither Laertes, nor yet the swineherd, nor any ofthe servants, nor even Penelope herself. Let you and me exploit thewomen alone, and let us also make trial of some other of the menservants, to see who is on our side and whose hand is against us."

  • 努尔·白克力 07-30

      "I stayed there for seven years and got together much money amongthe Egyptians, for they all gave me something; but when it was nowgoing on for eight years there came a certain Phoenician, a cunningrascal, who had already committed all sorts of villainy, and thisman talked me over into going with him to Phoenicia, where his houseand his possessions lay. I stayed there for a whole twelve months, butat the end of that time when months and days had gone by till the sameseason had come round again, he set me on board a ship bound forLibya, on a pretence that I was to take a cargo along with him to thatplace, but really that he might sell me as a slave and take themoney I fetched. I suspected his intention, but went on board withhim, for I could not help it.

提交评论