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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:阿曼西奥奥尔捷加 大小:frnNLVla80974KB 下载:4UU6ENjV68246次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:q2STbo1352751条
日期:2020-08-04 11:39:10
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鲁道夫·罗斯勒

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then the dear old nurse Euryclea said, "You may kill me, Madam, orlet me live on in your house, whichever you please, but I will tellyou the real truth. I knew all about it, and gave him everything hewanted in the way of bread and wine, but he made me take my solemnoath that I would not tell you anything for some ten or twelve days,unless you asked or happened to hear of his having gone, for he didnot want you to spoil your beauty by crying. And now, Madam, wash yourface, change your dress, and go upstairs with your maids to offerprayers to Minerva, daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove, for she can savehim even though he be in the jaws of death. Do not trouble Laertes: hehas trouble enough already. Besides, I cannot think that the gods hatedie race of the race of the son of Arceisius so much, but there willbe a son left to come up after him, and inherit both the house and thefair fields that lie far all round it."
2.  "Then I said, 'I wish I could be as sure of killing you outright andsending you down to the house of Hades, as I am that it will take morethan Neptune to cure that eye of yours.'
3.  "Meanwhile her four servants, who are her housemaids, set abouttheir work. They are the children of the groves and fountains, andof the holy waters that run down into the sea. One of them spread afair purple cloth over a seat, and laid a carpet underneath it.Another brought tables of silver up to the seats, and set them withbaskets of gold. A third mixed some sweet wine with water in asilver bowl and put golden cups upon the tables, while the fourthshe brought in water and set it to boil in a large cauldron over agood fire which she had lighted. When the water in the cauldron wasboiling, she poured cold into it till it was just as I liked it, andthen she set me in a bath and began washing me from the cauldron aboutthe head and shoulders, to take the tire and stiffness out of mylimbs. As soon as she had done washing me and anointing me with oil,she arrayed me in a good cloak and shirt and led me to a richlydecorated seat inlaid with silver; there was a footstool also under myfeet. A maid servant then brought me water in a beautiful goldenewer and poured it into a silver basin for me to wash my hands, andshe drew a clean table beside me; an upper servant brought me breadand offered me many things of what there was in the house, and thenCirce bade me eat, but I would not, and sat without heeding what wasbefore me, still moody and suspicious.
4.  Thus did they converse. Then Arete told her maids to set a bed inthe room that was in the gatehouse, and make it with good red rugs,and to spread coverlets on the top of them with woollen cloaks forUlysses to wear. The maids thereon went out with torches in theirhands, and when they had made the bed they came up to Ulysses andsaid, "Rise, sir stranger, and come with us for your bed is ready,"and glad indeed was he to go to his rest.
5.  When she had done speaking Eumaeus went back to the suitors, forhe had explained everything. Then he went up to Telemachus and said inhis ear so that none could overhear him, "My dear sir, I will now goback to the pigs, to see after your property and my own business.You will look to what is going on here, but above all be careful tokeep out of danger, for there are many who bear you ill will. May Jovebring them to a bad end before they do us a mischief."
6.  As spoke he took Telemachus' spear, whereon he crossed the stonethreshold and came inside. Ulysses rose from his seat to give himplace as he entered, but Telemachus checked him; "Sit down, stranger."said he, "I can easily find another seat, and there is one here whowill lay it for me."

计划指导

1.  On hearing this Telemachus smiled to his father, but so that Eumaeuscould not see him.
2.  As he spoke he kissed his son, and a tear fell from his cheek onto the ground, for he had restrained all tears till now. butTelemachus could not yet believe that it was his father, and said:
3.  Then Dolius put out both his hands and went up to Ulysses. "Sir,"said he, seizing his master's hand and kissing it at the wrist, "wehave long been wishing you home: and now heaven has restored you to usafter we had given up hoping. All hail, therefore, and may the godsprosper you. But tell me, does Penelope already know of your return,or shall we send some one to tell her?"
4.  "At first she would have nothing to do with his wicked scheme, forshe was of a good natural disposition; moreover there was a bardwith her, to whom Agamemnon had given strict orders on setting out forTroy, that he was to keep guard over his wife; but when heaven hadcounselled her destruction, Aegisthus thus this bard off to a desertisland and left him there for crows and seagulls to batten upon- afterwhich she went willingly enough to the house of Aegisthus. Then heoffered many burnt sacrifices to the gods, and decorated manytemples with tapestries and gilding, for he had succeeded far beyondhis expectations.
5.  "This was what she said, and we assented; whereon we could see herworking on her great web all day long, but at night she would unpickthe stitches again by torchlight. She fooled us in this way forthree years and we never found her out, but as time wore on and shewas now in her fourth year, one of her maids who knew what she wasdoing told us, and we caught her in the act of undoing her work, soshe had to finish it whether she would or no. The suitors,therefore, make you this answer, that both you and the Achaeans mayunderstand-'Send your mother away, and bid her marry the man of herown and of her father's choice'; for I do not know what will happen ifshe goes on plaguing us much longer with the airs she gives herself onthe score of the accomplishments Minerva has taught her, and becauseshe is so clever. We never yet heard of such a woman; we know allabout Tyro, Alcmena, Mycene, and the famous women of old, but theywere nothing to your mother, any one of them. It was not fair of herto treat us in that way, and as long as she continues in the mind withwhich heaven has now endowed her, so long shall we go on eating upyour estate; and I do not see why she should change, for she getsall the honour and glory, and it is you who pay for it, not she.Understand, then, that we will not go back to our lands, neitherhere nor elsewhere, till she has made her choice and married someone or other of us."
6.  With these words she flew away like a bird into the air, but she hadgiven Telemachus courage, and had made him think more than everabout his father. He felt the change, wondered at it, and knew thatthe stranger had been a god, so he went straight to where thesuitors were sitting.

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1.  "When we reached it we went ashore to take in water, and dinedhard by the ships. Immediately after dinner I took a herald and one ofmy men and went straight to the house of Aeolus, where I found himfeasting with his wife and family; so we sat down as suppliants on thethreshold. They were astounded when they saw us and said, 'Ulysses,what brings you here? What god has been ill-treating you? We tookgreat pains to further you on your way home to Ithaca, or whereverit was that you wanted to go to.'
2.  "Ulysses," replied Alcinous, "not one of us who sees you has anyidea that you are a charlatan or a swindler. I know there are manypeople going about who tell such plausible stories that it is veryhard to see through them, but there is a style about your languagewhich assures me of your good disposition. Moreover you have toldthe story of your own misfortunes, and those of the Argives, as thoughyou were a practised bard; but tell me, and tell me true, whetheryou saw any of the mighty heroes who went to Troy at the same timewith yourself, and perished there. The evenings are still at theirlongest, and it is not yet bed time- go on, therefore, with yourdivine story, for I could stay here listening till to-morrowmorning, so long as you will continue to tell us of your adventures."
3.  "That night we rested and nursed our anger, for Jove was hatchingmischief against us. But in the morning some of us drew our ships intothe water and put our goods with our women on board, while the rest,about half in number, stayed behind with Agamemnon. We- the otherhalf- embarked and sailed; and the ships went well, for heaven hadsmoothed the sea. When we reached Tenedos we offered sacrifices to thegods, for we were longing to get home; cruel Jove, however, did notyet mean that we should do so, and raised a second quarrel in thecourse of which some among us turned their ships back again, andsailed away under Ulysses to make their peace with Agamemnon; but I,and all the ships that were with me pressed forward, for I saw thatmischief was brewing. The son of Tydeus went on also with me, andhis crews with him. Later on Menelaus joined us at Lesbos, and foundus making up our minds about our course- for we did not know whetherto go outside Chios by the island of Psyra, keeping this to ourleft, or inside Chios, over against the stormy headland of Mimas. Sowe asked heaven for a sign, and were shown one to the effect that weshould be soonest out of danger if we headed our ships across the opensea to Euboea. This we therefore did, and a fair wind sprang upwhich gave us a quick passage during the night to Geraestus, wherewe offered many sacrifices to Neptune for having helped us so far onour way. Four days later Diomed and his men stationed their ships inArgos, but I held on for Pylos, and the wind never fell light from theday when heaven first made it fair for me.
4.  "In the end I deemed it would be the best plan to do as follows. TheCyclops had a great club which was lying near one of the sheep pens;it was of green olive wood, and he had cut it intending to use itfor a staff as soon as it should be dry. It was so huge that wecould only compare it to the mast of a twenty-oared merchant vessel oflarge burden, and able to venture out into open sea. I went up to thisclub and cut off about six feet of it; I then gave this piece to themen and told them to fine it evenly off at one end, which theyproceeded to do, and lastly I brought it to a point myself, charringthe end in the fire to make it harder. When I had done this I hid itunder dung, which was lying about all over the cave, and told themen to cast lots which of them should venture along with myself tolift it and bore it into the monster's eye while he was asleep. Thelot fell upon the very four whom I should have chosen, and I myselfmade five. In the evening the wretch came back from shepherding, anddrove his flocks into the cave- this time driving them all inside, andnot leaving any in the yards; I suppose some fancy must have takenhim, or a god must have prompted him to do so. As soon as he had putthe stone back to its place against the door, he sat down, milkedhis ewes and his goats all quite rightly, and then let each have herown young one; when he had got through with all this work, hegripped up two more of my men, and made his supper off them. So I wentup to him with an ivy-wood bowl of black wine in my hands:
5.   "Come on each of you in his turn, going towards the right from theplace at which the. cupbearer begins when he is handing round thewine."
6.  With these words she made them all want to come, and they flocked tothe assembly till seats and standing room were alike crowded. Everyone was struck with the appearance of Ulysses, for Minerva hadbeautified him about the head and shoulders, making him look tallerand stouter than he really was, that he might impress the Phaeciansfavourably as being a very remarkable man, and might come off wellin the many trials of skill to which they would challenge him. Then,when they were got together, Alcinous spoke:

应用

1.  When Euryclea heard this she unfastened the door of the women's roomand came out, following Telemachus. She found Ulysses among thecorpses bespattered with blood and filth like a lion that has justbeen devouring an ox, and his breast and both his cheeks are allbloody, so that he is a fearful sight; even so was Ulyssesbesmirched from head to foot with gore. When she saw all the corpsesand such a quantity of blood, she was beginning to cry out for joy,for she saw that a great deed had been done; but Ulysses checkedher, "Old woman," said he, "rejoice in silence; restrain yourself, anddo not make any noise about it; it is an unholy thing to vaunt overdead men. Heaven's doom and their own evil deeds have brought thesemen to destruction, for they respected no man in the whole world,neither rich nor poor, who came near them, and they have come to a badend as a punishment for their wickedness and folly. Now, however, tellme which of the women in the house have misconducted themselves, andwho are innocent."
2.  On this he broke up the assembly, and every man went back to his ownabode, while the suitors returned to the house of Ulysses.
3.  "'Strangers, who are you? Where do sail from? Are you traders, or doyou sail the as rovers, with your hands against every man, and everyman's hand against you?'
4、  "Fountain nymphs," he cried, "children of Jove, if ever Ulyssesburned you thigh bones covered with fat whether of lambs or kids,grant my prayer that heaven may send him home. He would soon put anend to the swaggering threats with which such men as you go aboutinsulting people-gadding all over the town while your flocks are goingto ruin through bad shepherding."
5、  "On this the men would have come with me at once, but Eurylochustried to hold them back and said, 'Alas, poor wretches that we are,what will become of us? Rush not on your ruin by going to the house ofCirce, who will turn us all into pigs or wolves or lions, and we shallhave to keep guard over her house. Remember how the Cyclops treated uswhen our comrades went inside his cave, and Ulysses with them. Itwas all through his sheer folly that those men lost their lives.'

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  • 斯坦尼尔·哈 08-03

      And Ulysses answered, "Nurse, you ought not to speak in that way;I am well able to form my own opinion about one and all of them;hold your tongue and leave everything to heaven."

  • 卢奇 08-03

      "For a whole month the wind blew steadily from the South, andthere was no other wind, but only South and East. As long as cornand wine held out the men did not touch the cattle when they werehungry; when, however, they had eaten all there was in the ship,they were forced to go further afield, with hook and line, catchingbirds, and taking whatever they could lay their hands on; for theywere starving. One day, therefore, I went up inland that I mightpray heaven to show me some means of getting away. When I had gone farenough to be clear of all my men, and had found a place that waswell sheltered from the wind, I washed my hands and prayed to allthe gods in Olympus till by and by they sent me off into a sweetsleep.

  • 赵母 08-03

       "But there! It rests with heaven to determine whether he is toreturn, and take his revenge in his own house or no; I would, however,urge you to set about trying to get rid of these suitors at once. Takemy advice, call the Achaean heroes in assembly to-morrow -lay yourcase before them, and call heaven to bear you witness. Bid the suitorstake themselves off, each to his own place, and if your mother'smind is set on marrying again, let her go back to her father, who willfind her a husband and provide her with all the marriage gifts that sodear a daughter may expect. As for yourself, let me prevail upon youto take the best ship you can get, with a crew of twenty men, and goin quest of your father who has so long been missing. Some one maytell you something, or (and people often hear things in this way) someheaven-sent message may direct you. First go to Pylos and askNestor; thence go on to Sparta and visit Menelaus, for he got homelast of all the Achaeans; if you hear that your father is alive and onhis way home, you can put up with the waste these suitors will makefor yet another twelve months. If on the other hand you hear of hisdeath, come home at once, celebrate his funeral rites with all duepomp, build a barrow to his memory, and make your mother marryagain. Then, having done all this, think it well over in your mindhow, by fair means or foul, you may kill these suitors in your ownhouse. You are too old to plead infancy any longer; have you not heardhow people are singing Orestes' praises for having killed his father'smurderer Aegisthus? You are a fine, smart looking fellow; show yourmettle, then, and make yourself a name in story. Now, however, Imust go back to my ship and to my crew, who will be impatient if Ikeep them waiting longer; think the matter over for yourself, andremember what I have said to you."

  • 劳拉·莱特 08-03

      "There I tried to land, but could not, for it was a bad place andthe waves dashed me against the rocks, so I again took to the seaand swam on till I came to a river that seemed the most likely landingplace, for there were no rocks and it was sheltered from the wind.Here, then, I got out of the water and gathered my senses togetheragain. Night was coming on, so I left the river, and went into athicket, where I covered myself all over with leaves, and presentlyheaven sent me off into a very deep sleep. Sick and sorry as I was Islept among the leaves all night, and through the next day tillafternoon, when I woke as the sun was westering, and saw yourdaughter's maid servants playing upon the beach, and your daughteramong them looking like a goddess. I besought her aid, and sheproved to be of an excellent disposition, much more so than could beexpected from so young a person- for young people are apt to bethoughtless. She gave me plenty of bread and wine, and when she hadhad me washed in the river she also gave me the clothes in which yousee me. Now, therefore, though it has pained me to do so, I havetold you the whole truth."

  • 托马斯·鲁尔兹 08-02

    {  And Ulysses answered, "I understand and heed. Go in first andleave me here where I am. I am quite used to being beaten and havingthings thrown at me. I have been so much buffeted about in war andby sea that I am case-hardened, and this too may go with the rest. Buta man cannot hide away the cravings of a hungry belly; this is anenemy which gives much trouble to all men; it is because of thisthat ships are fitted out to sail the seas, and to make war upon otherpeople."

  • 沈桂林 08-01

      Thus did they converse, and presently the swineherds came up withthe pigs, which were then shut up for the night in their sties, anda tremendous squealing they made as they were being driven intothem. But Eumaeus called to his men and said, "Bring in the best pigyou have, that I may sacrifice for this stranger, and we will taketoll of him ourselves. We have had trouble enough this long timefeeding pigs, while others reap the fruit of our labour."}

  • 余晨 08-01

      "Telemachus, insolent braggart that you are, how dare you try tothrow the blame upon us suitors? It is your mother's fault not ours,for she is a very artful woman. This three years past, and close onfour, she has been driving us out of our minds, by encouraging eachone of us, and sending him messages without meaning one word of whatshe says. And then there was that other trick she played us. She setup a great tambour frame in her room, and began to work on an enormouspiece of fine needlework. 'Sweet hearts,' said she, 'Ulysses is indeeddead, still do not press me to marry again immediately, wait- for Iwould not have skill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I havecompleted a pall for the hero Laertes, to be in readiness againstthe time when death shall take him. He is very rich, and the womenof the place will talk if he is laid out without a pall.'

  • 喻锎 08-01

      And Ulysses answered, "I will tell you all about it. If there weremeat and wine enough, and we could stay here in the hut with nothingto do but to eat and drink while the others go to their work, Icould easily talk on for a whole twelve months without everfinishing the story of the sorrows with which it has pleased heaven tovisit me.

  • 李春梅 07-31

       On this he handed them a piece of fat roast loin, which had been setnear him as being a prime part, and they laid their hands on thegood things that were before them; as soon as they had had enough toeat and drink, Telemachus said to the son of Nestor, with his headso close that no one might hear, "Look, Pisistratus, man after myown heart, see the gleam of bronze and gold- of amber, ivory, andsilver. Everything is so splendid that it is like seeing the palace ofOlympian Jove. I am lost in admiration."

  • 贾班长 07-29

    {  As she spoke Minerva touched him with her wand and covered himwith wrinkles, took away all his yellow hair, and withered the fleshover his whole body; she bleared his eyes, which were naturally veryfine ones; she changed his clothes and threw an old rag of a wrapabout him, and a tunic, tattered, filthy, and begrimed with smoke; shealso gave him an undressed deer skin as an outer garment, andfurnished him with a staff and a wallet all in holes, with a twistedthong for him to sling it over his shoulder.

  • 高生韬 07-29

      "'Keep still,' said he in a low voice, 'or the others will hearyou.' Then he raised his head on his elbow.

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