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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:董峻 大小:4uqFR7SH45982KB 下载:scYlJdDj70078次
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日期:2020-08-06 15:40:51
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  BOOK VIII.
2.  "We sailed hence, always in much distress, till we came to theland of the lawless and inhuman Cyclopes. Now the Cyclopes neitherplant nor plough, but trust in providence, and live on such wheat,barley, and grapes as grow wild without any kind of tillage, and theirwild grapes yield them wine as the sun and the rain may grow them.They have no laws nor assemblies of the people, but live in caves onthe tops of high mountains; each is lord and master in his family, andthey take no account of their neighbours.
3.  Thus did he urge the swineherd; Eumaeus, therefore, took hissandals, bound them to his feet, and started for the town. Minervawatched him well off the station, and then came up to it in the formof a woman- fair, stately, and wise. She stood against the side of theentry, and revealed herself to Ulysses, but Telemachus could not seeher, and knew not that she was there, for the gods do not letthemselves be seen by everybody. Ulysses saw her, and so did the dogs,for they did not bark, but went scared and whining off to the otherside of the yards. She nodded her head and motioned to Ulysses withher eyebrows; whereon he left the hut and stood before her outside themain wall of the yards. Then she said to him:
4.  "This dream, Madam," replied Ulysses, "can admit but of oneinterpretation, for had not Ulysses himself told you how it shall befulfilled? The death of the suitors is portended, and not one singleone of them will escape."
5.  Thus did they converse. Meanwhile Eurynome and the nurse tooktorches and made the bed ready with soft coverlets; as soon as theyhad laid them, the nurse went back into the house to go to her rest,leaving the bed chamber woman Eurynome to show Ulysses and Penelope tobed by torch light. When she had conducted them to their room she wentback, and they then came joyfully to the rites of their own old bed.Telemachus, Philoetius, and the swineherd now left off dancing, andmade the women leave off also. They then laid themselves down to sleepin the cloisters.
6.  Leiocritus, son of Evenor, answered him saying, "Mentor, whatfolly is all this, that you should set the people to stay us? It isa hard thing for one man to fight with many about his victuals. Eventhough Ulysses himself were to set upon us while we are feasting inhis house, and do his best to oust us, his wife, who wants him back sovery badly, would have small cause for rejoicing, and his bloodwould be upon his own head if he fought against such great odds. Thereis no sense in what you have been saying. Now, therefore, do youpeople go about your business, and let his father's old friends,Mentor and Halitherses, speed this boy on his journey, if he goes atall- which I do not think he will, for he is more likely to stay wherehe is till some one comes and tells him something."

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1.  "I should have done so at once," replied Neptune, "if I were notanxious to avoid anything that might displease you; now, therefore,I should like to wreck the Phaecian ship as it is returning from itsescort. This will stop them from escorting people in future; and Ishould also like to bury their city under a huge mountain."
2.  Then they stood on one side and went to tell the girl, while Ulysseswashed himself in the stream and scrubbed the brine from his backand from his broad shoulders. When he had thoroughly washed himself,and had got the brine out of his hair, he anointed himself with oil,and put on the clothes which the girl had given him; Minerva then madehim look taller and stronger than before, she also made the hairgrow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders as askilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcan andMinerva enriches a piece of silver plate by gilding it- and his workis full of beauty. Then he went and sat down a little way off upon thebeach, looking quite young and handsome, and the girl gazed on himwith admiration; then she said to her maids:
3.  "It was day-break by the time she had done speaking, so shedressed me in my shirt and cloak. As for herself she threw a beautifullight gossamer fabric over her shoulders, fastening it with a goldengirdle round her waist, and she covered her head with a mantle. Then Iwent about among the men everywhere all over the house, and spokekindly to each of them man by man: 'You must not lie sleeping here anylonger,' said I to them, 'we must be going, for Circe has told meall about it.' And this they did as I bade them.
4.  "Stockman, and you swineherd, I have something in my mind which I amin doubt whether to say or no; but I think I will say it. Whatmanner of men would you be to stand by Ulysses, if some god shouldbring him back here all of a sudden? Say which you are disposed to do-to side with the suitors, or with Ulysses?"
5.  Now when the sun had set and darkness was over the land.
6.  Penelope presently reached the oak threshold of the store room;the carpenter had planed this duly, and had drawn a line on it so asto get it quite straight; he had then set the door posts into it andhung the doors. She loosed the strap from the handle of the door,put in the key, and drove it straight home to shoot back the boltsthat held the doors; these flew open with a noise like a bullbellowing in a meadow, and Penelope stepped upon the raisedplatform, where the chests stood in which the fair linen and clotheswere laid by along with fragrant herbs: reaching thence, she took downthe bow with its bow case from the peg on which it hung. She satdown with it on her knees, weeping bitterly as she took the bow out ofits case, and when her tears had relieved her, she went to thecloister where the suitors were, carrying the bow and the quiver, withthe many deadly arrows that were inside it. Along with her came hermaidens, bearing a chest that contained much iron and bronze which herhusband had won as prizes. When she reached the suitors, she stoodby one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the cloister,holding a veil before her face, and with a maid on either side of her.Then she said:

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1.  Minerva answered, "Do not try to keep me, for I would be on my wayat once. As for any present you may be disposed to make me, keep ittill I come again, and I will take it home with me. You shall giveme a very good one, and I will give you one of no less value inreturn."
2.  This frightened Irus still more, but they brought him into themiddle of the court, and the two men raised their hands to fight. ThenUlysses considered whether he should let drive so hard at him as tomake an end of him then and there, or whether he should give him alighter blow that should only knock him down; in the end he deemedit best to give the lighter blow for fear the Achaeans should begin tosuspect who he was. Then they began to fight, and Irus hit Ulysseson the right shoulder; but Ulysses gave Irus a blow on the neckunder the ear that broke in the bones of his skull, and the blood camegushing out of his mouth; he fell groaning in the dust, gnashing histeeth and kicking on the ground, but the suitors threw up theirhands and nearly died of laughter, as Ulysses caught hold of him bythe foot and dragged him into the outer court as far as thegate-house. There he propped him up against the wall and put his staffin his hands. "Sit here," said he, "and keep the dogs and pigs off;you are a pitiful creature, and if you try to make yourself king ofthe beggars any more you shall fare still worse."
3.  As he spoke he made a sign with his eyebrows, and Telemachusgirded on his sword, grasped his spear, and stood armed beside hisfather's seat.
4.  Euryclea left the cloister to tell the women, and make them cometo Ulysses; in the meantime he called Telemachus, the stockman, andthe swineherd. "Begin," said he, "to remove the dead, and make thewomen help you. Then, get sponges and clean water to swill down thetables and seats. When you have thoroughly cleansed the wholecloisters, take the women into the space between the domed room andthe wall of the outer court, and run them through with your swordstill they are quite dead, and have forgotten all about love and theway in which they used to lie in secret with the suitors."
5.   "'Let me tell you,' said I, 'whichever of the goddesses you mayhappen to be, that I am not staying here of my own accord, but musthave offended the gods that live in heaven. Tell me, therefore, forthe gods know everything. which of the immortals it is that ishindering me in this way, and tell me also how I may sail the sea soas to reach my home.'
6.  "My friend," said he, "you are the first person whom I have met within this country; I salute you, therefore, and beg you to be willdisposed towards me. Protect these my goods, and myself too, for Iembrace your knees and pray to you as though you were a god. Tellme, then, and tell me truly, what land and country is this? Who areits inhabitants? Am I on an island, or is this the sea board of somecontinent?"

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1.  Minerva answered, "Never mind about him, I sent him that he might bewell spoken of for having gone. He is in no sort of difficulty, but isstaying quite comfortably with Menelaus, and is surrounded withabundance of every kind. The suitors have put out to sea and are lyingin wait for him, for they mean to kill him before he can get home. Ido not much think they will succeed, but rather that some of those whoare now eating up your estate will first find a grave themselves."
2.  Thereon he floated about for two nights and two days in the water,with a heavy swell on the sea and death staring him in the face; butwhen the third day broke, the wind fell and there was a dead calmwithout so much as a breath of air stirring. As he rose on the swellhe looked eagerly ahead, and could see land quite near. Then, aschildren rejoice when their dear father begins to get better afterhaving for a long time borne sore affliction sent him by some angryspirit, but the gods deliver him from evil, so was Ulysses thankfulwhen he again saw land and trees, and swam on with all his strengththat he might once more set foot upon dry ground. When, however, hegot within earshot, he began to hear the surf thundering up againstthe rocks, for the swell still broke against them with a terrificroar. Everything was enveloped in spray; there were no harbourswhere a ship might ride, nor shelter of any kind, but onlyheadlands, low-lying rocks, and mountain tops.
3.  Leiodes then caught the knees of Ulysses and said, "Ulysses Ibeseech you have mercy upon me and spare me. I never wronged any ofthe women in your house either in word or deed, and I tried to stopthe others. I saw them, but they would not listen, and now they arepaying for their folly. I was their sacrificing priest; if you killme, I shall die without having done anything to deserve it, andshall have got no thanks for all the good that I did."
4、  On this she led the way, and Ulysses followed in her steps; butnot one of the Phaecians could see him as he passed through the cityin the midst of them; for the great goddess Minerva in her good willtowards him had hidden him in a thick cloud of darkness. He admiredtheir harbours, ships, places of assembly, and the lofty walls ofthe city, which, with the palisade on top of them, were very striking,and when they reached the king's house Minerva said:
5、  They did as they were told, and set food before Ulysses, who ate anddrank ravenously, for it was long since he had had food of any kind.Meanwhile, Nausicaa bethought her of another matter. She got the linenfolded and placed in the waggon, she then yoked the mules, and, as shetook her seat, she called Ulysses:

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  • 姜争民 08-05

      This was what they said, but they did not know what was going tohappen. Then Antinous said, "Comrades, let there be no loud talking,lest some of it get carried inside. Let us be up and do that insilence, about which we are all of a mind."

  • 陈迪和 08-05

      "After her I saw Iphimedeia wife of Aloeus who boasted the embraceof Neptune. She bore two sons Otus and Ephialtes, but both wereshort lived. They were the finest children that were ever born in thisworld, and the best looking, Orion only excepted; for at nine yearsold they were nine fathoms high, and measured nine cubits round thechest. They threatened to make war with the gods in Olympus, and triedto set Mount Ossa on the top of Mount Olympus, and Mount Pelion on thetop of Ossa, that they might scale heaven itself, and they wouldhave done it too if they had been grown up, but Apollo, son of Leto,killed both of them, before they had got so much as a sign of hairupon their cheeks or chin.

  • 于淼 08-05

       "I will tell you truly," answered Nestor, "and indeed you haveyourself divined how it all happened. If Menelaus when he got backfrom Troy had found Aegisthus still alive in his house, there wouldhave been no barrow heaped up for him, not even when he was dead,but he would have been thrown outside the city to dogs and vultures,and not a woman would have mourned him, for he had done a deed ofgreat wickedness; but we were over there, fighting hard at Troy, andAegisthus who was taking his ease quietly in the heart of Argos,cajoled Agamemnon's wife Clytemnestra with incessant flattery.

  • 童建明 08-05

      When she had done speaking Eumaeus went back to the suitors, forhe had explained everything. Then he went up to Telemachus and said inhis ear so that none could overhear him, "My dear sir, I will now goback to the pigs, to see after your property and my own business.You will look to what is going on here, but above all be careful tokeep out of danger, for there are many who bear you ill will. May Jovebring them to a bad end before they do us a mischief."

  • 巴拉克 08-04

    {  "Then some malicious god conveyed Ulysses to the upland farm wherehis swineherd lives. Thither presently came also his son, returningfrom a voyage to Pylos, and the two came to the town when they hadhatched their plot for our destruction. Telemachus came first, andthen after him, accompanied by the swineherd, came Ulysses, clad inrags and leaning on a staff as though he were some miserable oldbeggar. He came so unexpectedly that none of us knew him, not even theolder ones among us, and we reviled him and threw things at him. Heendured both being struck and insulted without a word, though he wasin his own house; but when the will of Aegis-bearing Jove inspiredhim, he and Telemachus took the armour and hid it in an inner chamber,bolting the doors behind them. Then he cunningly made his wife offerhis bow and a quantity of iron to be contended for by us ill-fatedsuitors; and this was the beginning of our end, for not one of uscould string the bow- nor nearly do so. When it was about to reach thehands of Ulysses, we all of us shouted out that it should not be givenhim, no matter what he might say, but Telemachus insisted on hishaving it. When he had got it in his hands he strung it with easeand sent his arrow through the iron. Then he stood on the floor of thecloister and poured his arrows on the ground, glaring fiercely abouthim. First he killed Antinous, and then, aiming straight before him,he let fly his deadly darts and they fell thick on one another. It wasplain that some one of the gods was helping them, for they fell uponus with might and main throughout the cloisters, and there was ahideous sound of groaning as our brains were being battered in, andthe ground seethed with our blood. This, Agamemnon, is how we cameby our end, and our bodies are lying still un-cared for in the houseof Ulysses, for our friends at home do not yet know what has happened,so that they cannot lay us out and wash the black blood from ourwounds, making moan over us according to the offices due to thedeparted."

  • 袁恒金 08-03

      "I also saw fair Epicaste mother of king OEdipodes whose awful lotit was to marry her own son without suspecting it. He married herafter having killed his father, but the gods proclaimed the wholestory to the world; whereon he remained king of Thebes, in great grieffor the spite the gods had borne him; but Epicaste went to the houseof the mighty jailor Hades, having hanged herself for grief, and theavenging spirits haunted him as for an outraged mother- to his ruingbitterly thereafter.}

  • 肖菊华 08-03

      Thus roundly did they rate one another on the smooth pavement infront of the doorway, and when Antinous saw what was going on helaughed heartily and said to the others, "This is the finest sportthat you ever saw; heaven never yet sent anything like it into thishouse. The stranger and Irus have quarreled and are going to fight,let us set them on to do so at once."

  • 祝剑禾 08-03

      Thereon he loosed the bonds that bound them, and as soon as theywere free they scampered off, Mars to Thrace and laughter-loving Venusto Cyprus and to Paphos, where is her grove and her altar fragrantwith burnt offerings. Here the Graces hathed her, and anointed herwith oil of ambrosia such as the immortal gods make use of, and theyclothed her in raiment of the most enchanting beauty.

  • 籍鲔 08-02

       "Goddess," answered Ulysses, "all that you have said is true, butI am in some doubt as to how I shall be able to kill these wickedsuitors single handed, seeing what a number of them there alwaysare. And there is this further difficulty, which is still moreconsiderable. Supposing that with Jove's and your assistance I succeedin killing them, I must ask you to consider where I am to escape tofrom their avengers when it is all over."

  • 赵忠平 07-31

    {  Now the night came on stormy and very dark, for there was no moon.It poured without ceasing, and the wind blew strong from the West,which is a wet quarter, so Ulysses thought he would see whetherEumaeus, in the excellent care he took of him, would take off hisown cloak and give it him, or make one of his men give him one."Listen to me," said he, "Eumaeus and the rest of you; when I havesaid a prayer I will tell you something. It is the wine that makesme talk in this way; wine will make even a wise man fall to singing;it will make him chuckle and dance and say many a word that he hadbetter leave unspoken; still, as I have begun, I will go on. Wouldthat I were still young and strong as when we got up an ambuscadebefore Troy. Menelaus and Ulysses were the leaders, but I was incommand also, for the other two would have it so. When we had comeup to the wall of the city we crouched down beneath our armour and laythere under cover of the reeds and thick brush-wood that grew aboutthe swamp. It came on to freeze with a North wind blowing; the snowfell small and fine like hoar frost, and our shields were coated thickwith rime. The others had all got cloaks and shirts, and sleptcomfortably enough with their shields about their shoulders, but I hadcarelessly left my cloak behind me, not thinking that I should betoo cold, and had gone off in nothing but my shirt and shield. Whenthe night was two-thirds through and the stars had shifted their theirplaces, I nudged Ulysses who was close to me with my elbow, and heat once gave me his ear.

  • 冯·勒 07-31

      Now when Penelope heard that the beggar had been struck in thebanqueting-cloister, she said before her maids, "Would that Apollowould so strike you, Antinous," and her waiting woman Eurynomeanswered, "If our prayers were answered not one of the suitors wouldever again see the sun rise." Then Penelope said, "Nurse, I hate everysingle one of them, for they mean nothing but mischief, but I hateAntinous like the darkness of death itself. A poor unfortunate tramphas come begging about the house for sheer want. Every one else hasgiven him something to put in his wallet, but Antinous has hit himon the right shoulder-blade with a footstool."

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