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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:西尔维斯特雷 大小:nUsp5oW584264KB 下载:u2D6ey7O12080次
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日期:2020-08-05 18:33:48
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  As he spoke he reeled, and fell sprawling face upwards on theground. His great neck hung heavily backwards and a deep sleep tookhold upon him. Presently he turned sick, and threw up both wine andthe gobbets of human flesh on which he had been gorging, for he wasvery drunk. Then I thrust the beam of wood far into the embers to heatit, and encouraged my men lest any of them should turnfaint-hearted. When the wood, green though it was, was about to blaze,I drew it out of the fire glowing with heat, and my men gathered roundme, for heaven had filled their hearts with courage. We drove thesharp end of the beam into the monster's eye, and bearing upon it withall my weight I kept turning it round and round as though I wereboring a hole in a ship's plank with an auger, which two men with awheel and strap can keep on turning as long as they choose. Eventhus did we bore the red hot beam into his eye, till the boiling bloodbubbled all over it as we worked it round and round, so that the steamfrom the burning eyeball scalded his eyelids and eyebrows, and theroots of the eye sputtered in the fire. As a blacksmith plunges an axeor hatchet into cold water to temper it- for it is this that givesstrength to the iron- and it makes a great hiss as he does so, eventhus did the Cyclops' eye hiss round the beam of olive wood, and hishideous yells made the cave ring again. We ran away in a fright, buthe plucked the beam all besmirched with gore from his eye, andhurled it from him in a frenzy of rage and pain, shouting as he did soto the other Cyclopes who lived on the bleak headlands near him; sothey gathered from all quarters round his cave when they heard himcrying, and asked what was the matter with him.
2.  Menelaus on hearing this was very much shocked. "So," heexclaimed, "these cowards would usurp a brave man's bed? A hindmight as well lay her new born young in the lair of a lion, and thengo off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell: the lion whenhe comes back to his lair will make short work with the pair ofthem- and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By father Jove, Minerva,and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he was when he wrestledwith Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him so heavily that all theAchaeans cheered him- if he is still such and were to come nearthese suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorry wedding.As regards your questions, however, I will not prevaricate nor deceiveyou, but will tell you without concealment all that the old man of thesea told me.
3.  "My friend," said Nestor, "now that you remind me, I remember tohave heard that your mother has many suitors, who are ill disposedtowards you and are making havoc of your estate. Do you submit to thistamely, or are public feeling and the voice of heaven against you? Whoknows but what Ulysses may come back after all, and pay thesescoundrels in full, either single-handed or with a force of Achaeansbehind him? If Minerva were to take as great a liking to you as shedid to Ulysses when we were fighting before Troy (for I never yetsaw the gods so openly fond of any one as Minerva then was of yourfather), if she would take as good care of you as she did of him,these wooers would soon some of them him, forget their wooing."
4.  "When I had nearly got back to the ship some god took pity upon mysolitude, and sent a fine antlered stag right into the middle of mypath. He was coming down his pasture in the forest to drink of theriver, for the heat of the sun drove him, and as he passed I struckhim in the middle of the back; the bronze point of the spear wentclean through him, and he lay groaning in the dust until the life wentout of him. Then I set my foot upon him, drew my spear from the wound,and laid it down; I also gathered rough grass and rushes and twistedthem into a fathom or so of good stout rope, with which I bound thefour feet of the noble creature together; having so done I hung himround my neck and walked back to the ship leaning upon my spear, forthe stag was much too big for me to be able to carry him on myshoulder, steadying him with one hand. As I threw him down in front ofthe ship, I called the men and spoke cheeringly man by man to eachof them. 'Look here my friends,' said I, 'we are not going to die somuch before our time after all, and at any rate we will not starveso long as we have got something to eat and drink on board.' On thisthey uncovered their heads upon the sea shore and admired the stag,for he was indeed a splendid fellow. Then, when they had feasted theireyes upon him sufficiently, they washed their hands and began tocook him for dinner.
5.  MINERVA now put it in Penelope's mind to make the suitors trytheir skill with the bow and with the iron axes, in contest amongthemselves, as a means of bringing about their destruction. She wentupstairs and got the store room key, which was made of bronze andhad a handle of ivory; she then went with her maidens into the storeroom at the end of the house, where her husband's treasures of gold,bronze, and wrought iron were kept, and where was also his bow, andthe quiver full of deadly arrows that had been given him by a friendwhom he had met in Lacedaemon- Iphitus the son of Eurytus. The twofell in with one another in Messene at the house of Ortilochus,where Ulysses was staying in order to recover a debt that was owingfrom the whole people; for the Messenians had carried off threehundred sheep from Ithaca, and had sailed away with them and withtheir shepherds. In quest of these Ulysses took a long journey whilestill quite young, for his father and the other chieftains sent him ona mission to recover them. Iphitus had gone there also to try andget back twelve brood mares that he had lost, and the mule foalsthat were running with them. These mares were the death of him inthe end, for when he went to the house of Jove's son, mighty Hercules,who performed such prodigies of valour, Hercules to his shame killedhim, though he was his guest, for he feared not heaven's vengeance,nor yet respected his own table which he had set before Iphitus, butkilled him in spite of everything, and kept the mares himself. Itwas when claiming these that Iphitus met Ulysses, and gave him the bowwhich mighty Eurytus had been used to carry, and which on his deathhad been left by him to his son. Ulysses gave him in return a swordand a spear, and this was the beginning of a fast friendship, althoughthey never visited at one another's houses, for Jove's son Herculeskilled Iphitus ere they could do so. This bow, then, given him byIphitus, had not been taken with him by Ulysses when he sailed forTroy; he had used it so long as he had been at home, but had left itbehind as having been a keepsake from a valued friend.
6.  And Ulysses answered, "King Alcinous, if you were to bid me tostay here for a whole twelve months, and then speed me on my way,loaded with your noble gifts, I should obey you gladly and it wouldredound greatly to my advantage, for I should return fuller-handedto my own people, and should thus be more respected and beloved by allwho see me when I get back to Ithaca."

计划指导

1.  On this the goatherd Melanthius went by back passages to the storeroom of Ulysses, house. There he chose twelve shields, with as manyhelmets and spears, and brought them back as fast as he could togive them to the suitors. Ulysses' heart began to fail him when he sawthe suitors putting on their armour and brandishing their spears. Hesaw the greatness of the danger, and said to Telemachus, "Some oneof the women inside is helping the suitors against us, or it may beMelanthius."
2.  This was how they talked, but they knew nothing about it; andAlcinous said, "I remember now the old prophecy of my father. Hesaid that Neptune would be angry with us for taking every one sosafely over the sea, and would one day wreck a Phaeacian ship as itwas returning from an escort, and bury our city under a high mountain.This was what my old father used to say, and now it is all comingtrue. Now therefore let us all do as I say; in the first place we mustleave off giving people escorts when they come here, and in the nextlet us sacrifice twelve picked bulls to Neptune that he may have mercyupon us, and not bury our city under the high mountain." When thepeople heard this they were afraid and got ready the bulls.
3.  With these words he sat down, and Mentor who had been a friend ofUlysses, and had been left in charge of everything with full authorityover the servants, rose to speak. He, then, plainly and in all honestyaddressed them thus:
4.  Penelope was moved still more deeply as she heard the indisputableproofs that Ulysses laid before her; and when she had again foundrelief in tears she said to him, "Stranger, I was already disposedto pity you, but henceforth you shall be honoured and made welcomein my house. It was I who gave Ulysses the clothes you speak of. Itook them out of the store room and folded them up myself, and Igave him also the gold brooch to wear as an ornament. Alas! I shallnever welcome him home again. It was by an ill fate that he ever setout for that detested city whose very name I cannot bring myselfeven to mention."
5.  Then Theoclymenus said, 'And what, my dear young friend, is tobecome of me? To whose house, among all your chief men, am I torepair? or shall I go straight to your own house and to your mother?"
6.  Thus spoke the daughter of Jove, and they obeyed her saying. Menservants poured water over the hands of the guests, while pages filledthe mixing-bowls with wine and water, and handed it round after givingevery man his drink-offering; then they threw the tongues of thevictims into the fire, and stood up to make their drink-offerings.When they had made their offerings and had drunk each as much as hewas minded, Minerva and Telemachus were forgoing on board theirship, but Nestor caught them up at once and stayed them.

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1.  Then Telemachus said, "Eurymachus, and you other suitors, I shallsay no more, and entreat you no further, for the gods and the peopleof Ithaca now know my story. Give me, then, a ship and a crew oftwenty men to take me hither and thither, and I will go to Spartaand to Pylos in quest of my father who has so long been missing.Some one may tell me something, or (and people often hear things inthis way) some heaven-sent message may direct me. If I can hear of himas alive and on his way home I will put up with the waste yousuitors will make for yet another twelve months. If on the otherhand I hear of his death, I will return at once, celebrate his funeralrites with all due pomp, build a barrow to his memory, and make mymother marry again."
2.  Thus did they converse. Meanwhile the suitors were throwing discs,or aiming with spears at a mark on the levelled ground in front of thehouse, and behaving with all their old insolence. But when it wasnow time for dinner, and the flock of sheep and goats had come intothe town from all the country round, with their shepherds as usual,then Medon, who was their favourite servant, and who waited uponthem at table, said, "Now then, my young masters, you have hadenough sport, so come inside that we may get dinner ready. Dinner isnot a bad thing, at dinner time."
3.  As he spoke he drew his keen blade of bronze, sharpened on bothsides, and with a loud cry sprang towards Ulysses, but Ulyssesinstantly shot an arrow into his breast that caught him by thenipple and fixed itself in his liver. He dropped his sword and felldoubled up over his table. The cup and all the meats went over on tothe ground as he smote the earth with his forehead in the agonies ofdeath, and he kicked the stool with his feet until his eyes wereclosed in darkness.
4.  But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment drop theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become still more bitteragainst them. Now there happened to be among them a ribald fellow,whose name was Ctesippus, and who came from Same. This man,confident in his great wealth, was paying court to the wife ofUlysses, and said to the suitors, "Hear what I have to say. Thestranger has already had as large a portion as any one else; this iswell, for it is not right nor reasonable to ill-treat any guest ofTelemachus who comes here. I will, however, make him a present on myown account, that he may have something to give to the bath-woman,or to some other of Ulysses' servants."
5.   On this Minerva came close up to him and said, "Son of Arceisius-best friend I have in the world- pray to the blue-eyed damsel, andto Jove her father; then poise your spear and hurl it."
6.  Thus spoke Menelaus, and the heart of Telemachus yearned as hebethought him of his father. Tears fell from his eyes as he heardhim thus mentioned, so that he held his cloak before his face withboth hands. When Menelaus saw this he doubted whether to let himchoose his own time for speaking, or to ask him at once and findwhat it was all about.

应用

1.  Irus was very angry and answered, "You filthy glutton, you run ontrippingly like an old fish-fag. I have a good mind to lay bothhands about you, and knock your teeth out of your head like so manyboar's tusks. Get ready, therefore, and let these people here stand byand look on. You will never be able to fight one who is so muchyounger than yourself."
2.  When she had thus spoken she led the way rapidly before him, andUlysses followed in her steps; so the pair, goddess and man, went onand on till they came to Calypso's cave, where Ulysses took the seatthat Mercury had just left. Calypso set meat and drink before him ofthe food that mortals eat; but her maids brought ambrosia and nectarfor herself, and they laid their hands on the good things that werebefore them. When they had satisfied themselves with meat and drink,Calypso spoke, saying:
3.  And Jove said, "My child, what are you talking about? How can Iforget Ulysses than whom there is no more capable man on earth, normore liberal in his offerings to the immortal gods that live inheaven? Bear in mind, however, that Neptune is still furious withUlysses for having blinded an eye of Polyphemus king of theCyclopes. Polyphemus is son to Neptune by the nymph Thoosa, daughterto the sea-king Phorcys; therefore though he will not kill Ulyssesoutright, he torments him by preventing him from getting home.Still, let us lay our heads together and see how we can help him toreturn; Neptune will then be pacified, for if we are all of a mindhe can hardly stand out against us."
4、  This was how they talked. But Telemachus went down into the loftyand spacious store-room where his father's treasure of gold and bronzelay heaped up upon the floor, and where the linen and spare clotheswere kept in open chests. Here, too, there was a store of fragrantolive oil, while casks of old, well-ripened wine, unblended and fitfor a god to drink, were ranged against the wall in case Ulyssesshould come home again after all. The room was closed with well-madedoors opening in the middle; moreover the faithful old house-keeperEuryclea, daughter of Ops the son of Pisenor, was in charge ofeverything both night and day. Telemachus called her to the store-roomand said:
5、  On this Telemachus came forward and said, "Sirs, are you mad? Canyou not carry your meat and your liquor decently? Some evil spirit haspossessed you. I do not wish to drive any of you away, but you havehad your suppers, and the sooner you all go home to bed the better."

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  • 克里斯托弗·迪布瓦 08-04

      BOOK XIX.

  • 张云秀 08-04

      "Look to it yourself, father," answered Telemachus, "for they sayyou are the wisest counsellor in the world, and that there is no othermortal man who can compare with you. We will follow you with rightgood will, nor shall you find us fail you in so far as our strengthholds out."

  • 魏皓奋 08-04

       "Nine days and nine nights did we sail, and on the tenth day ournative land showed on the horizon. We got so close in that we couldsee the stubble fires burning, and I, being then dead beat, fellinto a light sleep, for I had never let the rudder out of my ownhands, that we might get home the faster. On this the men fell totalking among themselves, and said I was bringing back gold and silverin the sack that Aeolus had given me. 'Bless my heart,' would one turnto his neighbour, saying, 'how this man gets honoured and makesfriends to whatever city or country he may go. See what fine prizes heis taking home from Troy, while we, who have travelled just as faras he has, come back with hands as empty as we set out with- and nowAeolus has given him ever so much more. Quick- let us see what itall is, and how much gold and silver there is in the sack he gavehim.'

  • 杨君 08-04

      As he spoke he cut off the first piece and offered it as a burntsacrifice to the immortal gods; then he made them a drink-offering,put the cup in the hands of Ulysses, and sat down to his ownportion. Mesaulius brought them their bread; the swineherd hadbought this man on his own account from among the Taphians duringhis master's absence, and had paid for him with his own moneywithout saying anything either to his mistress or Laertes. They thenlaid their hands upon the good things that were before them, andwhen they had had enough to eat and drink, Mesaulius took away whatwas left of the bread, and they all went to bed after having made ahearty supper.

  • 敏武 08-03

    {  Then Jove's daughter Minerva came up to them, having assumed theform and voice of Mentor. Ulysses was glad when he saw her, and saidto his son Telemachus, "Telemachus, now that are about to fight inan engagement, which will show every man's mettle, be sure not todisgrace your ancestors, who were eminent for their strength andcourage all the world over."

  • 郑硕邵 08-02

      Penelope then spoke to him. "Antinous," said she, "it is not rightthat you should ill-treat any guest of Telemachus who comes to thishouse. If the stranger should prove strong enough to string the mightybow of Ulysses, can you suppose that he would take me home with himand make me his wife? Even the man himself can have no such idea inhis mind: none of you need let that disturb his feasting; it wouldbe out of all reason."}

  • 靳宅时 08-02

      Then Minerva left Scheria and went away over the sea. She went toMarathon and to the spacious streets of Athens, where she enteredthe abode of Erechtheus; but Ulysses went on to the house of Alcinous,and he pondered much as he paused a while before reaching thethreshold of bronze, for the splendour of the palace was like thatof the sun or moon. The walls on either side were of bronze from endto end, and the cornice was of blue enamel. The doors were gold, andhung on pillars of silver that rose from a floor of bronze, whilethe lintel was silver and the hook of the door was of gold.

  • 程午鹏 08-02

      "As we two sat weeping and talking thus sadly with one another theghost of Achilles came up to us with Patroclus, Antilochus, and Ajaxwho was the finest and goodliest man of all the Danaans after theson of Peleus. The fleet descendant of Aeacus knew me and spokepiteously, saying, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, what deed of daringwill you undertake next, that you venture down to the house of Hadesamong us silly dead, who are but the ghosts of them that can labour nomore?'

  • 安格斯 08-01

       "So I drew back, and sheathed my sword, whereon when he had drank ofthe blood he began with his prophecy.

  • 黄豆豆 07-30

    {  AND NOW, as Dawn rose from her couch beside Tithonus- harbinger oflight alike to mortals and immortals- the gods met in council and withthem, Jove the lord of thunder, who is their king. Thereon Minervabegan to tell them of the many sufferings of Ulysses, for she pitiedhim away there in the house of the nymph Calypso.

  • 李峻青 07-30

      "Thus, then, did we wait in great fear of mind till morning came,but when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, themale sheep hurried out to feed, while the ewes remained bleating aboutthe pens waiting to be milked, for their udders were full to bursting;but their master in spite of all his pain felt the backs of all thesheep as they stood upright, without being sharp enough to find outthat the men were underneath their bellies. As the ram was goingout, last of all, heavy with its fleece and with the weight of mycrafty self; Polyphemus laid hold of it and said:

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