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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:吉姆·凯瑞 大小:TLDMtlGg47221KB 下载:OsETSv9M88447次
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日期:2020-08-04 14:53:51
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韩宪章

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "You say truly, my dear father," answered Telemachus, "and you shallsee, if you will, that I am in no mind to disgrace your family."
2.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Eat, my good fellow, andenjoy your supper, such as it is. God grants this, and withholds that,just as he thinks right, for he can do whatever he chooses."
3.  "Madam;" answered Ulysses, "who on the face of the whole earth candare to chide with you? Your fame reaches the firmament of heavenitself; you are like some blameless king, who upholds righteousness,as the monarch over a great and valiant nation: the earth yields itswheat and barley, the trees are loaded with fruit, the ewes bringforth lambs, and the sea abounds with fish by reason of his virtues,and his people do good deeds under him. Nevertheless, as I sit here inyour house, ask me some other question and do not seek to know my raceand family, or you will recall memories that will yet more increase mysorrow. I am full of heaviness, but I ought not to sit weeping andwailing in another person's house, nor is it well to be thusgrieving continually. I shall have one of the servants or evenyourself complaining of me, and saying that my eyes swim with tearsbecause I am heavy with wine."
4.  "Queen Penelope," answered Eurymachus, "we do not suppose thatthis man will take you away with him; it is impossible; but we areafraid lest some of the baser sort, men or women among the Achaeans,should go gossiping about and say, 'These suitors are a feeble folk;they are paying court to the wife of a brave man whose bow not oneof them was able to string, and yet a beggarly tramp who came to thehouse strung it at once and sent an arrow through the iron.' This iswhat will be said, and it will be a scandal against us."
5.  Then Minerva left Scheria and went away over the sea. She went toMarathon and to the spacious streets of Athens, where she enteredthe abode of Erechtheus; but Ulysses went on to the house of Alcinous,and he pondered much as he paused a while before reaching thethreshold of bronze, for the splendour of the palace was like thatof the sun or moon. The walls on either side were of bronze from endto end, and the cornice was of blue enamel. The doors were gold, andhung on pillars of silver that rose from a floor of bronze, whilethe lintel was silver and the hook of the door was of gold.
6.  "Your guest has not disgraced you, Telemachus. I did not miss what Iaimed at, and I was not long in stringing my bow. I am still strong,and not as the suitors twit me with being. Now, however, it is timefor the Achaeans to prepare supper while there is still daylight,and then otherwise to disport themselves with song and dance which arethe crowning ornaments of a banquet."

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1.  "My good nurse," answered Penelope, "you must be mad. The godssometimes send some very sensible people out of their minds, andmake foolish people become sensible. This is what they must havebeen doing to you; for you always used to be a reasonable person.Why should you thus mock me when I have trouble enough already-talking such nonsense, and waking me up out of a sweet sleep thathad taken possession of my eyes and closed them? I have never slept sosoundly from the day my poor husband went to that city with theill-omened name. Go back again into the women's room; if it had beenany one else, who had woke me up to bring me such absurd news I shouldhave sent her away with a severe scolding. As it is, your age shallprotect you."
2.  Then Minerva said, "Yes, father stranger, I will show you thehouse you want, for Alcinous lives quite close to my own father. Iwill go before you and show the way, but say not a word as you go, anddo not look at any man, nor ask him questions; for the people herecannot abide strangers, and do not like men who come from some otherplace. They are a sea-faring folk, and sail the seas by the grace ofNeptune in ships that glide along like thought, or as a bird in theair."
3.  "'You will want no guide,' she answered; 'raise you mast, set yourwhite sails, sit quite still, and the North Wind will blow you thereof itself. When your ship has traversed the waters of Oceanus, youwill reach the fertile shore of Proserpine's country with its grovesof tall poplars and willows that shed their fruit untimely; here beachyour ship upon the shore of Oceanus, and go straight on to the darkabode of Hades. You will find it near the place where the riversPyriphlegethon and Cocytus (which is a branch of the river Styx)flow into Acheron, and you will see a rock near it, just where the tworoaring rivers run into one another.
4.  Then Penelope came down from her room looking like Venus or Diana,and they set her a seat inlaid with scrolls of silver and ivory nearthe fire in her accustomed place. It had been made by Icmalius and hada footstool all in one piece with the seat itself; and it wascovered with a thick fleece: on this she now sat, and the maids camefrom the women's room to join her. They set about removing thetables at which the wicked suitors had been dining, and took awaythe bread that was left, with the cups from which they had drunk. Theyemptied the embers out of the braziers, and heaped much wood upon themto give both light and heat; but Melantho began to rail at Ulysses asecond time and said, "Stranger, do you mean to plague us by hangingabout the house all night and spying upon the women? Be off, youwretch, outside, and eat your supper there, or you shall be driven outwith a firebrand."
5.  And Jove answered, "My child, why should you ask me? Was it not byyour own arrangement that Ulysses came home and took his revengeupon the suitors? Do whatever you like, but I will tell you what Ithink will be most reasonable arrangement. Now that Ulysses isrevenged, let them swear to a solemn covenant, in virtue of which heshall continue to rule, while we cause the others to forgive andforget the massacre of their sons and brothers. Let them then allbecome friends as heretofore, and let peace and plenty reign."
6.  Then Telemachus spoke, "Shameless," he cried, "and insolent suitors,let us feast at our pleasure now, and let there be no brawling, for itis a rare thing to hear a man with such a divine voice as Phemius has;but in the morning meet me in full assembly that I may give you formalnotice to depart, and feast at one another's houses, turn and turnabout, at your own cost. If on the other hand you choose to persist inspunging upon one man, heaven help me, but Jove shall reckon withyou in full, and when you fall in my father's house there shall beno man to avenge you."

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1.  "I too," answered Theoclymenus, am an exile, for I have killed a manof my own race. He has many brothers and kinsmen in Argos, and theyhave great power among the Argives. I am flying to escape death attheir hands, and am thus doomed to be a wanderer on the face of theearth. I am your suppliant; take me, therefore, on board your shipthat they may not kill me, for I know they are in pursuit."
2.  As he spoke he picked up a heifer's foot from the meat-basket inwhich it lay, and threw it at Ulysses, but Ulysses turned his head alittle aside, and avoided it, smiling grimly Sardinian fashion as hedid so, and it hit the wall, not him. On this Telemachus spokefiercely to Ctesippus, "It is a good thing for you," said he, "thatthe stranger turned his head so that you missed him. If you had hithim I should have run you through with my spear, and your father wouldhave had to see about getting you buried rather than married in thishouse. So let me have no more unseemly behaviour from any of you,for I am grown up now to the knowledge of good and evil and understandwhat is going on, instead of being the child that I have beenheretofore. I have long seen you killing my sheep and making free withmy corn and wine: I have put up with this, for one man is no match formany, but do me no further violence. Still, if you wish to kill me,kill me; I would far rather die than see such disgraceful scenes dayafter day- guests insulted, and men dragging the women servantsabout the house in an unseemly way."
3.  "When however, we had sacked the city of Priam, and were settingsail in our ships as heaven had dispersed us, then Jove saw fit to vexthe Argives on their homeward voyage; for they had Not all been eitherwise or understanding, and hence many came to a bad end through thedispleasure of Jove's daughter Minerva, who brought about a quarrelbetween the two sons of Atreus.
4.  Penelope heard what he was saying and scolded the maid, "Impudentbaggage, said she, "I see how abominably you are behaving, and youshall smart for it. You knew perfectly well, for I told you myself,that I was going to see the stranger and ask him about my husband, forwhose sake I am in such continual sorrow."
5.   To this Nausicaa answered, "Stranger, you appear to be a sensible,well-disposed person. There is no accounting for luck; Jove givesprosperity to rich and poor just as he chooses, so you must takewhat he has seen fit to send you, and make the best of it. Now,however, that you have come to this our country, you shall not wantfor clothes nor for anything else that a foreigner in distress mayreasonably look for. I will show you the way to the town, and willtell you the name of our people; we are called Phaeacians, and I amdaughter to Alcinous, in whom the whole power of the state is vested."
6.  Eumaeus was frightened at the outcry they all raised, so he putthe bow down then and there, but Telemachus shouted out at him fromthe other side of the cloisters, and threatened him saying, "FatherEumaeus, bring the bow on in spite of them, or young as I am I willpelt you with stones back to the country, for I am the better man ofthe two. I wish I was as much stronger than all the other suitors inthe house as I am than you, I would soon send some of them off sickand sorry, for they mean mischief."

应用

1.  "My dear child," answered Eurynome, "all that you have said is true,go and tell your son about it, but first wash yourself and anoint yourface. Do not go about with your cheeks all covered with tears; it isnot right that you should grieve so incessantly; for Telemachus,whom you always prayed that you might live to see with a beard, isalready grown up."
2.  Then Minerva bethought her of another matter. When she deemed thatUlysses had had both of his wife and of repose, she badegold-enthroned Dawn rise out of Oceanus that she might shed light uponmankind. On this, Ulysses rose from his comfortable bed and said toPenelope, "Wife, we have both of us had our full share of troubles,you, here, in lamenting my absence, and I in being prevented fromgetting home though I was longing all the time to do so. Now, however,that we have at last come together, take care of the property thatis in the house. As for the sheep and goats which the wicked suitorshave eaten, I will take many myself by force from other people, andwill compel the Achaeans to make good the rest till they shall havefilled all my yards. I am now going to the wooded lands out in thecountry to see my father who has so long been grieved on my account,and to yourself I will give these instructions, though you have littleneed of them. At sunrise it will at once get abroad that I have beenkilling the suitors; go upstairs, therefore, and stay there withyour women. See nobody and ask no questions."
3.  Then Alcinous told Laodamas and Halius to dance alone, for there wasno one to compete with them. So they took a red ball which Polybus hadmade for them, and one of them bent himself backwards and threw itup towards the clouds, while the other jumped from off the groundand caught it with ease before it came down again. When they haddone throwing the ball straight up into the air they began to dance,and at the same time kept on throwing it backwards and forwards to oneanother, while all the young men in the ring applauded and made agreat stamping with their feet. Then Ulysses said:
4、  "'Stay here, my brave fellows,' said I, 'all the rest of you,while I go with my ship and exploit these people myself: I want to seeif they are uncivilized savages, or a hospitable and humane race.'
5、  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Old man, you willneither get paid for bringing good news, nor will Ulysses ever comehome; drink you wine in peace, and let us talk about something else.Do not keep on reminding me of all this; it always pains me when anyone speaks about my honoured master. As for your oath we will let italone, but I only wish he may come, as do Penelope, his old fatherLaertes, and his son Telemachus. I am terribly unhappy too aboutthis same boy of his; he was running up fast into manhood, and badefare to be no worse man, face and figure, than his father, but someone, either god or man, has been unsettling his mind, so he has goneoff to Pylos to try and get news of his father, and the suitors arelying in wait for him as he is coming home, in the hope of leaving thehouse of Arceisius without a name in Ithaca. But let us say no moreabout him, and leave him to be taken, or else to escape if the sonof Saturn holds his hand over him to protect him. And now, old man,tell me your own story; tell me also, for I want to know, who youare and where you come from. Tell me of your town and parents, whatmanner of ship you came in, how crew brought you to Ithaca, and fromwhat country they professed to come- for you cannot have come byland."

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  • 谢华兵 08-03

      "Meanwhile Lampetie went straight off to the sun and told him we hadbeen killing his cows, whereon he flew into a great rage, and saidto the immortals, 'Father Jove, and all you other gods who live ineverlasting bliss, I must have vengeance on the crew of Ulysses' ship:they have had the insolence to kill my cows, which were the onething I loved to look upon, whether I was going up heaven or downagain. If they do not square accounts with me about my cows, I will godown to Hades and shine there among the dead.'

  • 陈艳春 08-03

      "For shame, Sir," answered Ulysses, fiercely, "you are an insolentfellow- so true is it that the gods do not grace all men alike inspeech, person, and understanding. One man may be of weak presence,but heaven has adorned this with such a good conversation that hecharms every one who sees him; his honeyed moderation carries hishearers with him so that he is leader in all assemblies of hisfellows, and wherever he goes he is looked up to. Another may be ashandsome as a god, but his good looks are not crowned with discretion.This is your case. No god could make a finer looking fellow than youare, but you are a fool. Your ill-judged remarks have made meexceedingly angry, and you are quite mistaken, for I excel in agreat many athletic exercises; indeed, so long as I had youth andstrength, I was among the first athletes of the age. Now, however, Iam worn out by labour and sorrow, for I have gone through much both onthe field of battle and by the waves of the weary sea; still, in spiteof all this I will compete, for your taunts have stung me to thequick."

  • 黄少毅 08-03

       "When I heard him I was in two minds whether or no to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh and cut his head off inspite of his being a near relation of my own; but the men intercededfor him and said, 'Sir, if it may so be, let this fellow stay here andmind the ship, but take the rest of us with you to Circe's house.'

  • 仲弘 08-03

      "Alas," he exclaimed, "among what manner of people am I fallen?Are they savage and uncivilized or hospitable and humane? Whereshall I put all this treasure, and which way shall I go? I wish Ihad stayed over there with the Phaeacians; or I could have gone tosome other great chief who would have been good to me and given mean escort. As it is I do not know where to put my treasure, and Icannot leave it here for fear somebody else should get hold of it.In good truth the chiefs and rulers of the Phaeacians have not beendealing fairly by me, and have left me in the wrong country; they saidthey would take me back to Ithaca and they have not done so: mayJove the protector of suppliants chastise them, for he watches overeverybody and punishes those who do wrong. Still, I suppose I mustcount my goods and see if the crew have gone off with any of them."

  • 高洪义 08-02

    {  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "The stranger is quitereasonable. He is avoiding the suitors, and is only doing what any oneelse would do. He asks you to wait till sundown, and it will be muchbetter, madam, that you should have him all to yourself, when youcan hear him and talk to him as you will."

  • 吕竟 08-01

      To this Penelope replied, "Eurymachus, heaven robbed me of all mybeauty whether of face or figure when the Argives set sail for Troyand my dear husband with them. If he were to return and look aftermy affairs, I should both be more respected and show a better presenceto the world. As it is, I am oppressed with care, and with theafflictions which heaven has seen fit to heap upon me. My husbandforesaw it all, and when he was leaving home he took my right wrist inhis hand- 'Wife, 'he said, 'we shall not all of us come safe homefrom Troy, for the Trojans fight well both with bow and spear. Theyare excellent also at fighting from chariots, and nothing decidesthe issue of a fight sooner than this. I know not, therefore,whether heaven will send me back to you, or whether I may not fallover there at Troy. In the meantime do you look after things here.Take care of my father and mother as at present, and even more soduring my absence, but when you see our son growing a beard, thenmarry whom you will, and leave this your present home. This is what hesaid and now it is all coming true. A night will come when I shallhave to yield myself to a marriage which I detest, for Jove hastaken from me all hope of happiness. This further grief, moreover,cuts me to the very heart. You suitors are not wooing me after thecustom of my country. When men are courting a woman who they thinkwill be a good wife to them and who is of noble birth, and when theyare each trying to win her for himself, they usually bring oxen andsheep to feast the friends of the lady, and they make hermagnificent presents, instead of eating up other people's propertywithout paying for it."}

  • 畅凯文 08-01

      This was how they talked, but they knew nothing about it; andAlcinous said, "I remember now the old prophecy of my father. Hesaid that Neptune would be angry with us for taking every one sosafely over the sea, and would one day wreck a Phaeacian ship as itwas returning from an escort, and bury our city under a high mountain.This was what my old father used to say, and now it is all comingtrue. Now therefore let us all do as I say; in the first place we mustleave off giving people escorts when they come here, and in the nextlet us sacrifice twelve picked bulls to Neptune that he may have mercyupon us, and not bury our city under the high mountain." When thepeople heard this they were afraid and got ready the bulls.

  • 韩空军 08-01

      BOOK XVI.

  • 江滨 07-31

       "Ulysses," said he, "now that you have reached my house I doubtnot you will get home without further misadventure no matter howmuch you have suffered in the past. To you others, however, who comehere night after night to drink my choicest wine and listen to mybard, I would insist as follows. Our guest has already packed up theclothes, wrought gold, and other valuables which you have broughtfor his acceptance; let us now, therefore, present him further, eachone of us, with a large tripod and a cauldron. We will recoupourselves by the levy of a general rate; for private individualscannot be expected to bear the burden of such a handsome present."

  • 卡图纳 07-29

    {  To this Telemachus answered, "By Jove, Agelaus, and by the sorrowsof my unhappy father, who has either perished far from Ithaca, or iswandering in some distant land, I throw no obstacles in the way ofmy mother's marriage; on the contrary I urge her to choosewhomsoever she will, and I will give her numberless gifts into thebargain, but I dare not insist point blank that she shall leave thehouse against her own wishes. Heaven forbid that I should do this."

  • 英特拉格斯 07-29

      "Alas," he cried to himself in his dismay, "what ever will become ofme, and how is it all to end? If I stay here upon the river bedthrough the long watches of the night, I am so exhausted that thebitter cold and damp may make an end of me- for towards sunrisethere will be a keen wind blowing from off the river. If, on the otherhand, I climb the hill side, find shelter in the woods, and sleep insome thicket, I may escape the cold and have a good night's rest,but some savage beast may take advantage of me and devour me."

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