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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:傅说 大小:vDvwZsC450258KB 下载:CMnD5imF44387次
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日期:2020-08-03 12:18:02
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "'Son of Atreus,' he answered, 'why ask me? You had better notknow what I can tell you, for your eyes will surely fill when you haveheard my story. Many of those about whom you ask are dead and gone,but many still remain, and only two of the chief men among theAchaeans perished during their return home. As for what happened onthe field of battle- you were there yourself. A third Achaean leaderis still at sea, alive, but hindered from returning. Ajax was wrecked,for Neptune drove him on to the great rocks of Gyrae; nevertheless, helet him get safe out of the water, and in spite of all Minerva'shatred he would have escaped death, if he had not ruined himself byboasting. He said the gods could not drown him even though they hadtried to do so, and when Neptune heard this large talk, he seizedhis trident in his two brawny hands, and split the rock of Gyrae intwo pieces. The base remained where it was, but the part on which Ajaxwas sitting fell headlong into the sea and carried Ajax with it; so hedrank salt water and was drowned.
2.  And Ulysses answered, "I will tell you all about it. If there weremeat and wine enough, and we could stay here in the hut with nothingto do but to eat and drink while the others go to their work, Icould easily talk on for a whole twelve months without everfinishing the story of the sorrows with which it has pleased heaven tovisit me.
3.  "And now for yourself- stay here some ten or twelve days longer, andI will then speed you on your way. I will make you a noble presentof a chariot and three horses. I will also give you a beautifulchalice that so long as you live you may think of me whenever you makea drink-offering to the immortal gods."
4.  On this they rose and went to the water side. The crew then drew theship on shore; their servants took their armour from them, and theywent up in a body to the place of assembly, but they would not let anyone old or young sit along with them, and Antinous, son ofEupeithes, spoke first.
5.  "Ill deeds do not prosper, and the weak confound the strong. See howlimping Vulcan, lame as he is, has caught Mars who is the fleetest godin heaven; and now Mars will be cast in heavy damages."
6.  "Antinous," answered Telemachus, "I cannot eat in peace, nor takepleasure of any kind with such men as you are. Was it not enoughthat you should waste so much good property of mine while I was yeta boy? Now that I am older and know more about it, I am also stronger,and whether here among this people, or by going to Pylos, I will doyou all the harm I can. I shall go, and my going will not be in vainthough, thanks to you suitors, I have neither ship nor crew of my own,and must be passenger not captain."

计划指导

1.  BOOK XIX.
2.  On hearing this Telemachus smiled to his father, but so that Eumaeuscould not see him.
3.  Then it vanished through the thong-hole of the door and wasdissipated into thin air; but Penelope rose from her sleep refreshedand comforted, so vivid had been her dream.
4.  Thus they spoke, for they thought that he had killed Antinous bymistake, and did not perceive that death was hanging over the headof every one of them. But Ulysses glared at them and said:
5.  BOOK XV.
6.  "Firstly, then, I will tell you my name that you too may know it,and one day, if I outlive this time of sorrow, may become my thereguests though I live so far away from all of you. I am Ulysses sonof Laertes, reknowned among mankind for all manner of subtlety, sothat my fame ascends to heaven. I live in Ithaca, where there is ahigh mountain called Neritum, covered with forests; and not far fromit there is a group of islands very near to one another- Dulichium,Same, and the wooded island of Zacynthus. It lies squat on thehorizon, all highest up in the sea towards the sunset, while theothers lie away from it towards dawn. It is a rugged island, but itbreeds brave men, and my eyes know none that they better love tolook upon. The goddess Calypso kept me with her in her cave, andwanted me to marry her, as did also the cunning Aeaean goddessCirce; but they could neither of them persuade me, for there isnothing dearer to a man than his own country and his parents, andhowever splendid a home he may have in a foreign country, if it be farfrom father or mother, he does not care about it. Now, however, I willtell you of the many hazardous adventures which by Jove's will I metwith on my return from Troy.

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1.  "As he spoke he pulled the herb out of the ground an showed mewhat it was like. The root was black, while the flower was as white asmilk; the gods call it Moly, and mortal men cannot uproot it, butthe gods can do whatever they like.
2.  "'You dare-devil,' replied the goddess, you are always wanting tofight somebody or something; you will not let yourself be beateneven by the immortals. For Scylla is not mortal; moreover she issavage, extreme, rude, cruel and invincible. There is no help forit; your best chance will be to get by her as fast as ever you can,for if you dawdle about her rock while you are putting on your armour,she may catch you with a second cast of her six heads, and snap upanother half dozen of your men; so drive your ship past her at fullspeed, and roar out lustily to Crataiis who is Scylla's dam, badluck to her; she will then stop her from making a second raid uponyou.
3.  When Menelaus heard this he immediately told his wife and servantsto prepare a sufficient dinner from what there might be in thehouse. At this moment Eteoneus joined him, for he lived close by andhad just got up; so Menelaus told him to light the fire and cooksome meat, which he at once did. Then Menelaus went down into hisfragrant store room, not alone, but Helen went too, withMegapenthes. When he reached the place where the treasures of hishouse were kept, he selected a double cup, and told his sonMegapenthes to bring also a silver mixing-bowl. Meanwhile Helen wentto the chest where she kept the lovely dresses which she had made withher own hands, and took out one that was largest and mostbeautifully enriched with embroidery; it glittered like a star, andlay at the very bottom of the chest. Then they all came back throughthe house again till they got to Telemachus, and Menelaus said,"Telemachus, may Jove, the mighty husband of Juno, bring you safelyhome according to your desire. I will now present you with thefinest and most precious piece of plate in all my house. It is amixing-bowl of pure silver, except the rim, which is inlaid with gold,and it is the work of Vulcan. Phaedimus king of the Sidonians mademe a present of it in the course of a visit that I paid him while Iwas on my return home. I should like to give it to you."
4.  "Fear not, nurse," answered Telemachus, "my scheme is not withoutheaven's sanction; but swear that you will say nothing about allthis to my mother, till I have been away some ten or twelve days,unless she hears of my having gone, and asks you; for I do not wanther to spoil her beauty by crying."
5.   Now when Penelope heard that the beggar had been struck in thebanqueting-cloister, she said before her maids, "Would that Apollowould so strike you, Antinous," and her waiting woman Eurynomeanswered, "If our prayers were answered not one of the suitors wouldever again see the sun rise." Then Penelope said, "Nurse, I hate everysingle one of them, for they mean nothing but mischief, but I hateAntinous like the darkness of death itself. A poor unfortunate tramphas come begging about the house for sheer want. Every one else hasgiven him something to put in his wallet, but Antinous has hit himon the right shoulder-blade with a footstool."
6.  MINERVA now put it in Penelope's mind to make the suitors trytheir skill with the bow and with the iron axes, in contest amongthemselves, as a means of bringing about their destruction. She wentupstairs and got the store room key, which was made of bronze andhad a handle of ivory; she then went with her maidens into the storeroom at the end of the house, where her husband's treasures of gold,bronze, and wrought iron were kept, and where was also his bow, andthe quiver full of deadly arrows that had been given him by a friendwhom he had met in Lacedaemon- Iphitus the son of Eurytus. The twofell in with one another in Messene at the house of Ortilochus,where Ulysses was staying in order to recover a debt that was owingfrom the whole people; for the Messenians had carried off threehundred sheep from Ithaca, and had sailed away with them and withtheir shepherds. In quest of these Ulysses took a long journey whilestill quite young, for his father and the other chieftains sent him ona mission to recover them. Iphitus had gone there also to try andget back twelve brood mares that he had lost, and the mule foalsthat were running with them. These mares were the death of him inthe end, for when he went to the house of Jove's son, mighty Hercules,who performed such prodigies of valour, Hercules to his shame killedhim, though he was his guest, for he feared not heaven's vengeance,nor yet respected his own table which he had set before Iphitus, butkilled him in spite of everything, and kept the mares himself. Itwas when claiming these that Iphitus met Ulysses, and gave him the bowwhich mighty Eurytus had been used to carry, and which on his deathhad been left by him to his son. Ulysses gave him in return a swordand a spear, and this was the beginning of a fast friendship, althoughthey never visited at one another's houses, for Jove's son Herculeskilled Iphitus ere they could do so. This bow, then, given him byIphitus, had not been taken with him by Ulysses when he sailed forTroy; he had used it so long as he had been at home, but had left itbehind as having been a keepsake from a valued friend.

应用

1.  While they were thus busy getting their dinner ready, Rumour wentround the town, and noised abroad the terrible fate that hadbefallen the suitors; as soon, therefore, as the people heard of itthey gathered from every quarter, groaning and hooting before thehouse of Ulysses. They took the dead away, buried every man his own,and put the bodies of those who came from elsewhere on board thefishing vessels, for the fishermen to take each of them to his ownplace. They then met angrily in the place of assembly, and when theywere got together Eupeithes rose to speak. He was overwhelmed withgrief for the death of his son Antinous, who had been the first mankilled by Ulysses, so he said, weeping bitterly, "My friend, thisman has done the Achaeans great wrong. He took many of our best menaway with him in his fleet, and he has lost both ships and men; now,moreover, on his return he has been killing all the foremost men amongthe Cephallenians. Let us be up and doing before he can get away toPylos or to Elis where the Epeans rule, or we shall be ashamed ofourselves for ever afterwards. It will be an everlasting disgrace tous if we do not avenge the murder of our sons and brothers. For my ownpart I should have no mote pleasure in life, but had rather die atonce. Let us be up, then, and after them, before they can cross overto the mainland."
2.  On this Minerva said, "Telemachus, what are you talking about?Heaven has a long arm if it is minded to save a man; and if it wereme, I should not care how much I suffered before getting home,provided I could be safe when I was once there. I would rather this,than get home quickly, and then be killed in my own house as Agamemnonwas by the treachery of Aegisthus and his wife. Still, death iscertain, and when a man's hour is come, not even the gods can savehim, no matter how fond they are of him."
3.  Thus did he speak, and his saying pleased them well, so Mulius ofDulichium, servant to Amphinomus, mixed them a bowl of wine andwater and handed it round to each of them man by man, whereon theymade their drink-offerings to the blessed gods: Then, when they hadmade their drink-offerings and had drunk each one as he was minded,they took their several ways each of them to his own abode.
4、  NOW when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Telemachus rose and dressed himself. He bound his sandals on to hiscomely feet, girded his sword about his shoulder, and left his roomlooking like an immortal god. He at once sent the criers round to callthe people in assembly, so they called them and the people gatheredthereon; then, when they were got together, he went to the place ofassembly spear in hand- not alone, for his two hounds went with him.Minerva endowed him with a presence of such divine comeliness that allmarvelled at him as he went by, and when he took his place' in hisfather's seat even the oldest councillors made way for him.
5、  "The men when they got on shore followed a level road by which thepeople draw their firewood from the mountains into the town, tillpresently they met a young woman who had come outside to fetchwater, and who was daughter to a Laestrygonian named Antiphates. Shewas going to the fountain Artacia from which the people bring in theirwater, and when my men had come close up to her, they asked her whothe king of that country might be, and over what kind of people heruled; so she directed them to her father's house, but when they gotthere they found his wife to be a giantess as huge as a mountain,and they were horrified at the sight of her.

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  • 何梦华 08-02

      Then Theoclymenus said, 'And what, my dear young friend, is tobecome of me? To whose house, among all your chief men, am I torepair? or shall I go straight to your own house and to your mother?"

  • 陈邦利 08-02

      "Thus spoke Eurylochus, and the men approved his words. Now thecattle, so fair and goodly, were feeding not far from the ship; themen, therefore drove in the best of them, and they all stood roundthem saying their prayers, and using young oak-shoots instead ofbarley-meal, for there was no barley left. When they had donepraying they killed the cows and dressed their carcasses; they cut outthe thigh bones, wrapped them round in two layers of fat, and set somepieces of raw meat on top of them. They had no wine with which to makedrink-offerings over the sacrifice while it was cooking, so theykept pouring on a little water from time to time while the inwardmeats were being grilled; then, when the thigh bones were burned andthey had tasted the inward meats, they cut the rest up small and putthe pieces upon the spits.

  • 刘元春 08-02

       When he had thus spoken, he said to his son Mercury, "Mercury, youare our messenger, go therefore and tell Calypso we have decreedthat poor Ulysses is to return home. He is to be convoyed neither bygods nor men, but after a perilous voyage of twenty days upon a rafthe is to reach fertile Scheria, the land of the Phaeacians, who arenear of kin to the gods, and will honour him as though he were oneof ourselves. They will send him in a ship to his own country, andwill give him more bronze and gold and raiment than he would havebrought back from Troy, if he had had had all his prize money andhad got home without disaster. This is how we have settled that heshall return to his country and his friends."

  • 杨谋林 08-02

      The suitors now aimed a second time, but again Minerva made theirweapons for the most part without effect. One hit a bearing-post ofthe cloister; another went against the door; while the pointed shaftof another struck the wall. Still, Amphimedon just took a piece of thetop skin from off Telemachus's wrist, and Ctesippus managed to grazeEumaeus's shoulder above his shield; but the spear went on and fell tothe ground. Then Ulysses and his men let drive into the crowd ofsuitors. Ulysses hit Eurydamas, Telemachus Amphimedon, and EumaeusPolybus. After this the stockman hit Ctesippus in the breast, andtaunted him saying, "Foul-mouthed son of Polytherses, do not be sofoolish as to talk wickedly another time, but let heaven direct yourspeech, for the gods are far stronger than men. I make you a presentof this advice to repay you for the foot which you gave Ulysses whenhe was begging about in his own house."

  • 罗大佑 08-01

    {  "I had hardly finished telling everything to the men before wereached the island of the two Sirens, for the wind had been veryfavourable. Then all of a sudden it fell dead calm; there was not abreath of wind nor a ripple upon the water, so the men furled thesails and stowed them; then taking to their oars they whitened thewater with the foam they raised in rowing. Meanwhile I look a largewheel of wax and cut it up small with my sword. Then I kneaded the waxin my strong hands till it became soft, which it soon did betweenthe kneading and the rays of the sun-god son of Hyperion. Then Istopped the ears of all my men, and they bound me hands and feet tothe mast as I stood upright on the crosspiece; but they went on rowingthemselves. When we had got within earshot of the land, and the shipwas going at a good rate, the Sirens saw that we were getting in shoreand began with their singing.

  • 吴小彬 07-31

      Menelaus was very angry and said, "Eteoneus, son of Boethous, younever used to be a fool, but now you talk like a simpleton. Take theirhorses out, of course, and show the strangers in that they may havesupper; you and I have stayed often enough at other people's housesbefore we got back here, where heaven grant that we may rest inpeace henceforward."}

  • 温东征 07-31

      As he was thus speaking a bird flew on his right hand- an eagle witha great white goose in its talons which it had carried off from thefarm yard- and all the men and women were running after it andshouting. It came quite close up to them and flew away on theirright hands in front of the horses. When they saw it they were glad,and their hearts took comfort within them, whereon Pisistratus said,"Tell me, Menelaus, has heaven sent this omen for us or for you?"

  • 罗隆基 07-31

      "The man who had seduced her then said, 'Would you like to comealong with us to see the house of your parents and your parentsthemselves? They are both alive and are said to be well off.'

  • 比勒 07-30

       He had hardly done speaking when Amphinomus turned in his placeand saw the ship inside the harbour, with the crew lowering her sails,and putting by their oars; so he laughed, and said to the others,"We need not send them any message, for they are here. Some god musthave told them, or else they saw the ship go by, and could notovertake her.

  • 杨生花 07-28

    {  "Sir, my father Nestor, when we used to talk about you at home, toldme you were a person of rare and excellent understanding. If, then, itbe possible, do as I would urge you. I am not fond of crying while Iam getting my supper. Morning will come in due course, and in theforenoon I care not how much I cry for those that are dead and gone.This is all we can do for the poor things. We can only shave our headsfor them and wring the tears from our cheeks. I had a brother who diedat Troy; he was by no means the worst man there; you are sure tohave known him- his name was Antilochus; I never set eyes upon himmyself, but they say that he was singularly fleet of foot and in fightvaliant."

  • 肖龙辉 07-28

      Here he ended, and the guests sat all of them enthralled andspeechless throughout the covered cloister. Then Arete said to them:

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