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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:黄智敏 大小:jGeiIi4p20567KB 下载:8aWvI8B043812次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:keVft2Qi85222条
日期:2020-08-06 01:50:55
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李燃

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  As he spoke he sat down, and Telemachus threw his arms about hisfather and wept. They were both so much moved that they cried aloudlike eagles or vultures with crooked talons that have been robbed oftheir half fledged young by peasants. Thus piteously did they weep,and the sun would have gone down upon their mourning if Telemachus hadnot suddenly said, "In what ship, my dear father, did your crewbring you to Ithaca? Of what nation did they declare themselves to be-for you cannot have come by land?"
2.  "King Alcinous, you said your people were the nimblest dancers inthe world, and indeed they have proved themselves to be so. I wasastonished as I saw them."
3.  "Nestor son of Neleus," answered Telemachus, "honour to theAchaean name, the Achaeans applaud Orestes and his name will livethrough all time for he has avenged his father nobly. Would thatheaven might grant me to do like vengeance on the insolence of thewicked suitors, who are ill treating me and plotting my ruin; butthe gods have no such happiness in store for me and for my father,so we must bear it as best we may."
4.  "When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, we admiredthe island and wandered all over it, while the nymphs Jove's daughtersroused the wild goats that we might get some meat for our dinner. Onthis we fetched our spears and bows and arrows from the ships, anddividing ourselves into three bands began to shoot the goats. Heavensent us excellent sport; I had twelve ships with me, and each ship gotnine goats, while my own ship had ten; thus through the livelong dayto the going down of the sun we ate and drank our fill,- and we hadplenty of wine left, for each one of us had taken many jars fullwhen we sacked the city of the Cicons, and this had not yet run out.While we were feasting we kept turning our eyes towards the land ofthe Cyclopes, which was hard by, and saw the smoke of their stubblefires. We could almost fancy we heard their voices and the bleating oftheir sheep and goats, but when the sun went down and it came on dark,we camped down upon the beach, and next morning I called a council.
5.  "Hear me," he cried, "daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove, unweariable,hear me now, for you gave no heed to my prayers when Neptune waswrecking me. Now, therefore, have pity upon me and grant that I mayfind friends and be hospitably received by the Phaecians."
6.  THEN Ulysses tore off his rags, and sprang on to the broadpavement with his bow and his quiver full of arrows. He shed thearrows on to the ground at his feet and said, "The mighty contest isat an end. I will now see whether Apollo will vouchsafe it to me tohit another mark which no man has yet hit."

计划指导

1.  "If you are Ulysses," said he, "then what you have said is just.We have done much wrong on your lands and in your house. ButAntinous who was the head and front of the offending lies low already.It was all his doing. It was not that he wanted to marry Penelope;he did not so much care about that; what he wanted was something quitedifferent, and Jove has not vouchsafed it to him; he wanted to killyour son and to be chief man in Ithaca. Now, therefore, that he hasmet the death which was his due, spare the lives of your people. Wewill make everything good among ourselves, and pay you in full for allthat we have eaten and drunk. Each one of us shall pay you a fineworth twenty oxen, and we will keep on giving you gold and bronze tillyour heart is softened. Until we have done this no one can complain ofyour being enraged against us."
2.  The ship bounded forward on her way as a four in hand chariotflies over the course when the horses feel the whip. Her prow curvetedas it were the neck of a stallion, and a great wave of dark blue waterseethed in her wake. She held steadily on her course, and even afalcon, swiftest of all birds, could not have kept pace with her.Thus, then, she cut her way through the water. carrying one who was ascunning as the gods, but who was now sleeping peacefully, forgetful ofall that he had suffered both on the field of battle and by thewaves of the weary sea.
3.  They therefore aimed straight in front of them and threw theirspears. Ulysses killed Demoptolemus, Telemachus Euryades, EumaeusElatus, while the stockman killed Pisander. These all bit the dust,and as the others drew back into a corner Ulysses and his men rushedforward and regained their spears by drawing them from the bodies ofthe dead.
4.  "When I heard him I was in two minds whether or no to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh and cut his head off inspite of his being a near relation of my own; but the men intercededfor him and said, 'Sir, if it may so be, let this fellow stay here andmind the ship, but take the rest of us with you to Circe's house.'
5.  Thus spoke the stockman, and Ulysses struck the son of Damastor witha spear in close fight, while Telemachus hit Leocritus son of Evenorin the belly, and the dart went clean through him, so that he fellforward full on his face upon the ground. Then Minerva from her seaton the rafter held up her deadly aegis, and the hearts of thesuitors quailed. They fled to the other end of the court like a herdof cattle maddened by the gadfly in early summer when the days areat their longest. As eagle-beaked, crook-taloned vultures from themountains swoop down on the smaller birds that cower in flocks uponthe ground, and kill them, for they cannot either fight or fly, andlookers on enjoy the sport- even so did Ulysses and his men fallupon the suitors and smite them on every side. They made a horriblegroaning as their brains were being battered in, and the groundseethed with their blood.
6.  "But I would not listen to them, and shouted out to him in myrage, 'Cyclops, if any one asks you who it was that put your eye outand spoiled your beauty, say it was the valiant warrior Ulysses, sonof Laertes, who lives in Ithaca.'

推荐功能

1.  "Then he dived under the sea, and she in due course bore Peliasand Neleus, who both of them served Jove with all their might.Pelias was a great breeder of sheep and lived in Iolcus, but the otherlived in Pylos. The rest of her children were by Cretheus, namely,Aeson, Pheres, and Amythaon, who was a mighty warrior and charioteer.
2.  As she spoke she drew a table loaded with ambrosia beside him andmixed him some red nectar, so Mercury ate and drank till he had hadenough, and then said:
3.  "Eumaeus, this house of Ulysses is a very fine place. No matterhow far you go you will find few like it. One building keeps followingon after another. The outer court has a wall with battlements allround it; the doors are double folding, and of good workmanship; itwould be a hard matter to take it by force of arms. I perceive, too,that there are many people banqueting within it, for there is asmell of roast meat, and I hear a sound of music, which the godshave made to go along with feasting."
4.  "Listen to me," he cried, "you suitors of Queen Penelope, that I mayspeak even as I am minded. A man knows neither ache nor pain if hegets hit while fighting for his money, or for his sheep or his cattle;and even so Antinous has hit me while in the service of my miserablebelly, which is always getting people into trouble. Still, if the poorhave gods and avenging deities at all, I pray them that Antinous maycome to a bad end before his marriage."
5.   "'You will now come to the Thrinacian island, and here you willsee many herds of cattle and flocks of sheep belonging to the sun-god-seven herds of cattle and seven flocks of sheep, with fifty head ineach flock. They do not breed, nor do they become fewer in number, andthey are tended by the goddesses Phaethusa and Lampetie, who arechildren of the sun-god Hyperion by Neaera. Their mother when shehad borne them and had done suckling them sent them to theThrinacian island, which was a long way off, to live there and lookafter their father's flocks and herds. If you leave these flocksunharmed, and think of nothing but getting home, you may yet aftermuch hardship reach Ithaca; but if you harm them, then I forewarnyou of the destruction both of your ship and of your comrades; andeven though you may yourself escape, you will return late, in badplight, after losing all your men.'
6.  Menelaus was thinking what would be the most proper answer for himto make, but Helen was too quick for him and said, "I will read thismatter as heaven has put it in my heart, and as I doubt not that itwill come to pass. The eagle came from the mountain where it wasbred and has its nest, and in like manner Ulysses, after havingtravelled far and suffered much, will return to take his revenge- ifindeed he is not back already and hatching mischief for the suitors."

应用

1.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "My son, I will tellyou the real truth. He says he is a Cretan, and that he has been agreat traveller. At this moment he is running away from aThesprotian ship, and has refuge at my station, so I will put him intoyour hands. Do whatever you like with him, only remember that he isyour suppliant."
2.  'Son-in-law and daughter," replied Autolycus, "call the childthus: I am highly displeased with a large number of people in oneplace and another, both men and women; so name the child 'Ulysses,' orthe child of anger. When he grows up and comes to visit his mother'sfamily on Mount Parnassus, where my possessions lie, I will make him apresent and will send him on his way rejoicing."
3.  NOW there came a certain common tramp who used to go begging allover the city of Ithaca, and was notorious as an incorrigibleglutton and drunkard. This man had no strength nor stay in him, but hewas a great hulking fellow to look at; his real name, the one hismother gave him, was Arnaeus, but the young men of the place calledhim Irus, because he used to run errands for any one who would sendhim. As soon as he came he began to insult Ulysses, and to try anddrive him out of his own house.
4、  "AFTER we were clear of the river Oceanus, and had got out intothe open sea, we went on till we reached the Aeaean island where thereis dawn and sunrise as in other places. We then drew our ship on tothe sands and got out of her on to the shore, where we went to sleepand waited till day should break.
5、  Then Minerva put it into the mind of Penelope to show herself to thesuitors, that she might make them still more enamoured of her, and winstill further honour from her son and husband. So she feigned amocking laugh and said, "Eurynome, I have changed my and have afancy to show myself to the suitors although I detest them. I shouldlike also to give my son a hint that he had better not have anythingmore to do with them. They speak fairly enough but they meanmischief."

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网友评论(RNyEYyNn11322))

  • 朱家辉 08-05

      "Thus they talked and evil counsels prevailed. They loosed the sack,whereupon the wind flew howling forth and raised a storm thatcarried us weeping out to sea and away from our own country. Then Iawoke, and knew not whether to throw myself into the sea or to live onand make the best of it; but I bore it, covered myself up, and laydown in the ship, while the men lamented bitterly as the fiercewinds bore our fleet back to the Aeolian island.

  • 段爱香 08-05

      But King Neptune, who was returning from the Ethiopians, caughtsight of Ulysses a long way off, from the mountains of the Solymi.He could see him sailing upon the sea, and it made him very angry,so he wagged his head and muttered to himself, saying, heavens, so thegods have been changing their minds about Ulysses while I was awayin Ethiopia, and now he is close to the land of the Phaeacians,where it is decreed that he shall escape from the calamities that havebefallen him. Still, he shall have plenty of hardship yet before hehas done with it."

  • 叶欣 08-05

       When Eumaeus heard this he went straight to Ulysses and said,"Father stranger, my mistress Penelope, mother of Telemachus, has sentfor you; she is in great grief, but she wishes to hear anything youcan tell her about her husband, and if she is satisfied that you arespeaking the truth, she will give you a shirt and cloak, which are thevery things that you are most in want of. As for bread, you can getenough of that to fill your belly, by begging about the town, andletting those give that will."

  • 高以翔 08-05

      So he hurried up without even taking his cloak off, and seized adisc, larger, more massive and much heavier than those used by thePhaeacians when disc-throwing among themselves. Then, swinging itback, he threw it from his brawny hand, and it made a humming sound inthe air as he did so. The Phaeacians quailed beneath the rushing ofits flight as it sped gracefully from his hand, and flew beyond anymark that had been made yet. Minerva, in the form of a man, came andmarked the place where it had fallen. "A blind man, Sir," said she,"could easily tell your mark by groping for it- it is so far aheadof any other. You may make your mind easy about this contest, for noPhaeacian can come near to such a throw as yours."

  • 林美新 08-04

    {  As he spoke he sprang from his seat, threw his crimson cloak fromhim, and took his sword from his shoulder. First he set the axes ina row, in a long groove which he had dug for them, and had Wadestraight by line. Then he stamped the earth tight round them, andeveryone was surprised when they saw him set up so orderly, thoughhe had never seen anything of the kind before. This done, he went onto the pavement to make trial of the bow; thrice did he tug at it,trying with all his might to draw the string, and thrice he had toleave off, though he had hoped to string the bow and shoot through theiron. He was trying for the fourth time, and would have strung ithad not Ulysses made a sign to check him in spite of all hiseagerness. So he said:

  • 吴逢旭 08-03

      "I hope, sir," said he, "that you will not be offended with what Iam going to say. Singing comes cheap to those who do not pay for it,and all this is done at the cost of one whose bones lie rotting insome wilderness or grinding to powder in the surf. If these men wereto see my father come back to Ithaca they would pray for longer legsrather than a longer purse, for money would not serve them; but he,alas, has fallen on an ill fate, and even when people do sometimes saythat he is coming, we no longer heed them; we shall never see himagain. And now, sir, tell me and tell me true, who you are and whereyou come from. Tell me of your town and parents, what manner of shipyou came in, how your crew brought you to Ithaca, and of what nationthey declared themselves to be- for you cannot have come by land. Tellme also truly, for I want to know, are you a stranger to this house,or have you been here in my father's time? In the old days we had manyvisitors for my father went about much himself."}

  • 张兴洪 08-03

      On this they hurried off on their several errands. The heifer wasbrought in from the plain, and Telemachus's crew came from the ship;the goldsmith brought the anvil, hammer, and tongs, with which heworked his gold, and Minerva herself came to the sacrifice. Nestorgave out the gold, and the smith gilded the horns of the heifer thatthe goddess might have pleasure in their beauty. Then Stratius andEchephron brought her in by the horns; Aretus fetched water from thehouse in a ewer that had a flower pattern on it, and in his other handhe held a basket of barley meal; sturdy Thrasymedes stood by with asharp axe, ready to strike the heifer, while Perseus held a bucket.Then Nestor began with washing his hands and sprinkling the barleymeal, and he offered many a prayer to Minerva as he threw a lockfrom the heifer's head upon the fire.

  • 沈静文 08-03

      And Jove said, "My child, what are you talking about? How can Iforget Ulysses than whom there is no more capable man on earth, normore liberal in his offerings to the immortal gods that live inheaven? Bear in mind, however, that Neptune is still furious withUlysses for having blinded an eye of Polyphemus king of theCyclopes. Polyphemus is son to Neptune by the nymph Thoosa, daughterto the sea-king Phorcys; therefore though he will not kill Ulyssesoutright, he torments him by preventing him from getting home.Still, let us lay our heads together and see how we can help him toreturn; Neptune will then be pacified, for if we are all of a mindhe can hardly stand out against us."

  • 马芜 08-02

       "Do we know, Menelaus," said she, "the names of these strangerswho have come to visit us? Shall I guess right or wrong?-but Icannot help saying what I think. Never yet have I seen either man orwoman so like somebody else (indeed when I look at him I hardly knowwhat to think) as this young man is like Telemachus, whom Ulysses leftas a baby behind him, when you Achaeans went to Troy with battle inyour hearts, on account of my most shameless self."

  • 甘忠 07-31

    {  "'My friends,' said he, 'I have had a dream from heaven in my sleep.We are a long way from the ships; I wish some one would go down andtell Agamemnon to send us up more men at once.'

  • 德博拉克拉克内尔 07-31

      Then Antinous said, "What god can have sent such a pestilence toplague us during our dinner? Get out, into the open part of the court,or I will give you Egypt and Cyprus over again for your insolenceand importunity; you have begged of all the others, and they havegiven you lavishly, for they have abundance round them, and it is easyto be free with other people's property when there is plenty of it."

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