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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:刘长忠 大小:4yE9DJZT18548KB 下载:evfpBL4846202次
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日期:2020-08-04 22:33:39
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唐海奎

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  A small matter, said the Friar, and truly payed backe againe tothe owner, in bestowing them on the poore. Many other questions hedemanded of him, whereto still he answered in the same manner. Butbefore he proceeded to absolution, Master Chappelet spake thus: I haveyet one sinne more, which I have not revealed to you: when being urgedby the Friar to confesse it, he said. I remember, that I should affordone day in the weeke, to cleanse the house of my soule, for betterentertainement to my Lord and Saviour, and yet I have done no suchreverence to the Sunday or Sabbath, as I ought to have done. A smallfault Sonne, replyed the Friar. O no (quoth Master Chappelet)doe not terme it a small fault, because Sunday being a holy day,is highly to be reverenced: for as on that day, our blessed Lord arosefrom death to life. But (quoth the Confessor) hast thou done nothingelse on that day? Yes, said he, being forgetfull of my selfe, once Idid spet in Gods Church. The Friar smiling, said: Alas Sonne, thatis a matter of no moment; for wee that are Religious persons, doeuse to spet there every day. The more is your shame, answered MasterChappelet, for no place ought to bee kept more pure and cleane thenthe sacred Temple, wherein our daily sacrifices are offered up to God.
2.  The Lady, who wept exceedingly, thus answered. Alas Sir: I knownot how to carry my selfe, in such extremity of greefe, as now youleave me; but if my life surmount the fortitude of sorrow, andwhatsoever shall happen to you for certainty, either life or death:I will live and dye the Wife of Signiour Thorello, and make myobsequies in his memory onely. so Madame (replyed her Husband) not so;Be not overrash in promising any thing, albeit I am well assured, thatso much as consisteth in thy strength, I make no question of thyperformance. But consider withall (deare heart) thou art a yong woman,beautifull, of great parentage, and no way thereto inferior in theblessings of Fortune.
3.  I being then made of flesh and blood, and so derived from yourselfe; having had also so little benefit of life, that I am yet in thespring, and blooming time of my blood: by either of these reasons, Imust needs be subject to naturall desires, wherein such knowledge as Ihave once already had, in the estate of my marriage, perhaps mightmove a further intelligence of the like delights, according to thebetter ability of strength, which exceeding all capacity ofresistance, induced a second motive to affection, answerable to mytime and youthfull desires, and so (like a yong woman) I became cameagaine; yet did I strive, even with all my utmost might, and bestvertuous faculties abiding in me, no way to disgrace either you ormy selfe, as (in equall censure) yet have I not done. But Nature isabove all humane power, and Love commanded by Nature, hath prevailedfor Love, joyning with Fortune: in meere pitty and commiseration of myextreame wrong, I found them both most benigne and gracious,teaching mee a way secret enough, whereby I might reach the heightof my desires, howsoever you became instructed, or (perhaps) foundit out by accident; so it was, and I deny it not.
4.  Now although Titus was confounded with shame, to yeeld consent, thatSophronia should be accepted as his wife, and used many obstinateresistances: yet notwithstanding, Love pleading on the one sidepowerfully, and Gisippus as earnestly perswading on the other, thus heanswered. Gisippus, I know not what to say, neither how to behave myselfe in this election, concerning the fitting of mine contentment, orpleasing thee in thy importunate perswasion. But seeing thy liberalityis so great, as it surmounteth all reason or shame in me, I will yeeldobedience to thy more then noble nature. Yet let this remaine forthine assurance, that I doe not receive this grace of thine, as aman not sufficiently understanding, how I enjoy from thee, not onelyher whom most of all I doe affect, but also doe hold my very life ofthee. Grant then you greatest Gods (if you be the Patrones of thismine unexpected felicitie) that with honor and due respect, I mayhereafter make apparantly knowne: how highly I acknowledge this thywonderfull favour, in being more mercifull to me, then I could be tomy selfe.
5.  When first I saw her lovely countenance,
6.  Now, whether feeding on salt meates before his coming thither, orcustomary use of drinking, which maketh men unable any long while toabstaine as being never satisfied with excesse; which of these twoextreames they were, I know not: but drinke needs he must. And, havingno other meanes for quenching his thirst, espied the glasse of waterstanding in the Window, and thinking it to be some soveraigne kinde ofwater, reserved by the Doctor for his owne drinking, to make him lustyin his old yeeres, he tooke the glasse; and finding the water pleasingto his pallate, dranke it off every drop; then sitting downe on aCoffer by the beds side, soone after he fell into a sound sleepe,according to the powerfull working of the water.

计划指导

1.  In those ancient and reverend dayes, wherof I am now to speake,the high renowne and admirable wisedome of Salomon, King of GreatBrittain, was most famous throughout all parts of the world; foranswering all doubtfull questions and demaunds whatsoever, thatpossibly could be propounded to him. So that many resorted to him,from the most remote and furthest off countreyes, to heare hismiraculous knowledge and experience, yea, and to crave his counsell,in matters of greatest importance. Among the rest of them whichrepaired thither, was a rich yong Gentleman, honourably descended,named Melisso, who came from the City of Laiazzo, where he was bothborne, and dwelt.
2.  Two Citizens of Siena, the one named Tingoccio Mini, and the otherMeucio di Tura, affected both one woman, called Monna Mita, to whomthe one of them was a Gossip. The Gossip dyed, and appearedafterward to his companion, according as he had formerly promisedhim to doe, and tolde him what strange wonders he had seene in theother world.
3.  COMMENDING THE GOOD JUDGEMENT AND UNDERSTANDING IN LADIES OR
4.  Come, take me quickly from so false a friend.
5.  Not long after, they finding the Citie, and behaviour of thepeople sufficiently pleasing to them; they resolved on theircontinuance heere, entering into a league of love and friendshippewith divers, never regarding, whether they were Gentlemen, or no, ordistinguishing the poore from the rich: but only in being conformeto their complexions, sociable and fit for friendship.
6.  As Massetto was thus about his Garden emploiment, the Nunnes beganto resort thither, and thinking the man to be dumbe and deafe indeede,were the more lavish of their language, mocking and flowting himvery immodestly, as being perswaded, that he heard them not. And theLady Abbesse, thinking he might as well be an Eunuch, as deprived bothof hearing and speaking, stood the lesse in feare of the Sisterswalkes, but referred them to their owne care and providence. On a day,Massetto having laboured somewhat extraordinarily, lay downe to resthimselfe awhile under the trees, and two delicate yong Nunnes, walkingthere to take the aire, drew neere to the place where he dissembledsleeping; and both of them observing his comelinesse of person,began to pitty the poverty of his condition; but much more themisery of his great defectes. Then one of them, who had a littlelivelier spirit then the other, thinking Massetto to be fastasleepe, began in this manner.

推荐功能

1.  THE NINTH DAY, THE SEVENTH NOVELL
2.  Beleeve it for a truth,
3.  In the meane while, Madame Helena remaining still on the Tower,began to comfort her selfe with a little vaine hope, yet sighing andweeping incessantly, seating her selfe so well as shee could, whereany small shelter might yeelde the least shade, in expectation ofthe Schollers returning: one while weeping, then againe hoping, butmost of all despairing, by his so long tarrying away with herGarments; so that beeing over-wearied with anguish and longwatching, she fell into a little slumbering. But the Sunne was soextreamly hot, the houre of noone being already past, that it meerlyparched her delicate body, and burnt her bare head so violently: asnot onely it seared all the flesh it touched; but also cleft andchinkt it strangely, beside blisters and other painfull scorchingsin the flesh which hindred her sleeping, to help her self (by allpossible means) waking. And the Turret being covered with Lead, gavethe greater addition to her torment; for, as she removed from oneplace to another, it yeelded no mitigation to the burning heate, butparched and wrinkled the flesh extraordinarily, even as when a pieceof parchment is throwne into the fire, and recovered out againe, cannever be extended to his former forme.
4.  Pamphilus hath declared to us, by his Tale, how the goodnesse of Godregardeth not our errors, when they proceede from things which weecannot discerne. And I intend to approove by mine, what argument ofinfallible truth, the same benignity delivereth of it selfe, byenduring patiently the faults of them, that (both in word and worke)should declare unfaigned testimony of such gracious goodnesse, and notto live so dissolutely as they doe. To the end, that othersillumined by their light of life, may beleeve with the strongerconstancy of minde.
5.   Why how now Calandrino? What may the meaning of this matter be?What, art thou preparing for building, that thou hast provided suchplenty of stones? How sitteth thy poore wife? How hast thou misusedher? Are these the behaviours of a wise or honest man? Calandrino,over-spent with travalle, and carrying such an huge burthen of stones,as also the toylesome beating of his Wife, (but much more impatientand offended, for that high good Fortune, which he imagined to havelost:) could not collect his spirits together, to answer them oneready word, wherefore hee sate fretting like a mad man. Whereupon,Buffalmaco thus began to him. Calandrino, if thou be angry with anyother, yet thou shouldest not have made such a mockery of us, asthou hast done: in leaving us (like a couple of coxcombes) to theplaine of Mugnone, whether thou leddest us with thee, to seeke aprecious stone called Helitropium. And couldst thou steale home, neverbidding us so much as farewell? How can we but take it in very evillpart, that thou shouldest so abuse two honest neighbours? Well, assurethy selfe, this is the last time that ever thou shalt serve us so.
6.  Every one there present answered, that they were well contented bothto eate and drinke, and let the shame fall where it deserved;whereupon, Bruno appointing them how they should sit, and placingCalandrino as one among them: he began his counterfeite exorcisme,giving each man a Pill, and Buffalmaco a Cup of Wine after it. Butwhen he came to Calandrino, hee tooke one of them which was made ofthe Dogges dates or Dowsets, and delivering it into his hand,presently hee put it into his mouth and chewed it. So soone as histongue tasted the bitter Aloes, he began to coughe and spet extreamly,as being utterly unable, to endure the bitternesse and noysomesmell. The other men that had receyved the Pils, beganne to gaze oneupon another, to see whose behaviour should discover him; and Brunohaving not (as yet) delivered Pils to them all, proceeded on stillin his businesse, as seeming not to heare any coughing, till onebehinde him, saide. What meaneth Calandrino by this spetting andcoughing?

应用

1.  Gracious company, there is no defect in this Banquet, or more debarsit of the honour it might else have, but onely the presence ofTheobaldo, who having bin continually in your company, it seemes youare not willing to take knowledge of him, and therefore I meane myselfe to shew him. So, uncasing himselfe out of his Pilgrimes clothes,and standing in his Hose and Doublet, to their no little admiration,they all knew him, yet doubted whether it were he, or no. Which heperceiving, he repeated his brethrens and absent kindreds names, andwhat occurrences hapned betweene them from time to time, beside therelation of his owne passed fortunes, inciting teares in the eyes ofhis brethren, and all else there present, every one hugging andembracing him, yea, many beside, who were no kin at all to him.Hermelina onely excepted: which when Aldobrandino saw, he said untoher; How now Hermelina? Why doest thou not welcome home Theobaldo,so kindly as the rest have done?
2.  There dwelt sometime in Florence, and in the street of SaintBrancazio, a woollen Weaver, named John of Lorrayne; a man morehappy in his Art, then wise in any thing else beside: because,savouring somewhat of the Gregorie, and (in very deede)
3.  THE FOURTH DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL
4、  Then the Children began to cry, saying; that they would tarriestil by the good olde man, because he loved them better then theirMaster did; whereat both the Lady and the Count began to smile. TheCount, a poore Begger, and not as Father to so great a Lady, arose,and did her humble reverence, because she was now a Noble Woman,conceyving wonderfull joy in his soule, to see her so faire and goodlya creature: yet could she take no knowledge of him, Age, want, andmisery had so mightily altered him; his head all white, his beardwithout any comly forme, his Garments so poore, and his face sowrinkled, leane and meager, that he seemed rather some Carter, thena Count. And Gianetta perceiving that when her Children were fetchtaway, they returned againe to the olde man, and would not leave him,she desired their Maister to let them alone.While thus the Children continued making much of the good olde man,Lord Andrew Mandevile, Father to Sir Roger, came into the Hall, asbeing so willed to doe by the Childrens Schoolemaster. He being ahastie-minded man, and one that ever-despised Gianetta before, butmuch more since her marriage to his sonne, angerly said; Let themalone with a mischeefe, and so befall them, their best company oughtto bee with beggers, for so they are bred and borne by the Mothersside: and therefore it is no mervaile, if like will to like, a beggersbrats to keepe company with beggers. The Count hearing thesecontemptible wordes, was not a little greeved thereat; and althoughhis courage was greater then his poore condition would permit him toexpresse; yet, clouding all injuries with noble patience, hangingdowne his head, and shedding many a salt teare, endured this reproach,as hee had done many, both before and after.
5、  Spinelloccio being departed from Zeppa (who followed faire andsoftly after him)

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网友评论(r02QHeDj83064))

  • 阿孜尔·阿合 08-03

      WHEREIN SUCH MEN ARE COVERTLY REPREHENDED, WHO MAKE NO CARE OR

  • 余昌富 08-03

      ACCOMPLISH HIS PURPOSE BY SOME OTHER SUPPLY

  • 秦海璐 08-03

       Alas my good Neighbours, you see at what unfitting houres, thisbad man comes home to his house, after hee hath lyen in a Taverneall day drunke, sleeping and snorting like a Swine. You are myhonest witnesses, how long I have suffered this beastlinesse in him,yet neyther your good counsell, nor my too often lovingadrionitions, can worke that good which wee have expected.Wherefore, to try if shame can procure any amendment, I have shuthim out of doores, until his drunken fit be over-past, and so he shallstand to coole his feet.

  • 柳扬 08-03

      Of those delights which kind contentment bring?

  • 徐丽雅 08-02

    {  In the dayes of the first King of Cyprus, after the Conquest made inthe holy Land by Godfrey of Bullen, it fortuned that a Gentlewomanof Gascoignie, travelling in pilgrimage to visit the sacredSepulcher in Jerusalem, returning home againe, arrived at Cyprus,where shee was villanously abused by certaine base wretches.Complaining thereof, without any comfort or redresse, shee intended tomake her moane to the King of the Country. Whereupon it was tolde her,that therein shee should but loose her labour, because hee was sowomanish, and faint-hearted; that not onely he refused to punishwith justice the offence of others, but also suffered shamefullinjuries done to himselfe. And therefore, such as were displeased byhis negligence, might easily discharge their spleene against him,and doe him what dishonour they would.

  • 赵朴初 08-01

      Ruggiero having this benefite of the Maides kinde love to him,made it an hopefull mounting Ladder, whereby to derive some goodliking from the Mistresse, presuming rather on his outward comelyparts, then any other honest qualitie that might commend him. TheMistresse knowing what choise her Maide had made, and unable by anyperswasions to remoove her, tooke knowledge of Ruggieroes privateresorting to her house, and in meere love to her Maide (who had verymany especiall deservings in her) oftentimes she would (in kindemanner) rebuke him, and advise him to a more settled course of life;which counsell, that it might take the better effect; she gracedwith liberall gifts: one while with Golde, others with Silver, andoften with garments, for his comelier accesse thither; which bounty,he (like a lewde mistaker) interpreted as assurances of heraffection to him, and that he was more gracefull in her eye, thenany man else could be.}

  • 黄远舫 08-01

      Can it be possible (quoth Helena) that you should be so benummedwith colde? Then I plainely perceive, that men can lye in their loveletters, which I can shew under your own hand, how you fryed inflames, and all for my love, and so have you written to me in everyletter. Poore credulous women are often thus deluded, in beleevingwhat men write and speake out of passion: but I will returne backeto my Brother, and make no doubt of dispatch, because I would gladlyhave your Company.

  • 黄贤君 08-01

      When the feasting was finished, he caused a Ship to be furnished forthem, graunting them license to depart from Geneway when they pleased;whither they returned most richly and joyfully, being welcomed homewith great honour, especially Madam Genevra, whom every one supposedto be dead; and alwayes after, so long as she lived, shee was mostfamous for her manifold vertues. But as for Ambroginolo, the veriesame day that hee was impaled on the stake, annointed with honey,and fixed in the place appointed, to his no meane torment: he notonely died, but likewise was devoured to the bare bones, by Flies,Waspes, and Hornets, whereof the Countrey notoriously aboundeth. Andhis bones, in full forme and fashion, remained strangely blacke fora long time after, knit together by the sinewes; as a witnesse to manythousands of people, which afterward beheld the Carkasse of hiswickednesse against so good and vertuous a Woman, that had not so muchas a thought of any evill towards him. And thus was the Proverbe trulyverified, that shame succeedeth after ugly sinne, and the deceiveris trampled and trod, by such as himselfe hath deceived.

  • 卜瑜 07-31

       A modest yong maiden named Lagina, following the same profession,and being an intimate familiar friend, Simonida tooke along in hercompany, and came to the Garden appointed by Pasquino; where she foundhim readily expecting her comming, and another friend also with him,called Puccino (albeit more usually tearmed Strambo) a secretwell-willer to Lagina, whose love became the more furthered by hisfriendly meeting. Each Lover delighting in his hearts chosenMistresse, caused them to walke alone by themselves, as thespaciousnesse of the Garden gave them ample liberty: Puccino withhis Lagina in one part, and Pasquino with his Simonida in another. Thewalke which they had made choise of, was by a long and goodly bed ofSage, turning and returning by the same bed their conference ministredoccasion, and as they pleased to recreate themselves, affecting ratherto continue still there, then in any part of the Garden.

  • 马万祺 07-29

    {  Ricciardo loving this Madam Catulla, and using all such meanswhereby the grace and liking of a Lady might be obtained; found it yeta matter beyond possibility, to compasse the height of his desire:so that many desperate and dangerous resolutions beleagred his braine,seeming so intricate and unlikely to affoord any hopefull yssue, ashee wished for nothing more then death.

  • 王成杰 07-29

      They created a kinde Society, consisting of about five and twentymen, who should meete together twice in a moneth, and in a placereputed convenient for them: where being so assembled, every manuttered his minde to those two Schollers, in such cases as they mostdesired, to have wherwith they were all satisfied the self-same night.It came so to passe, that Buffalmaco and I, grew into acquaintancewith those two worthy Schollers, and our private familiaritytogether proved so prosperous, that we were admitted into the sameSociety, and so have ever since continued. Now Sir, I am to tell youmatter deserving admiration, and which (in very good judgements) wouldseeme to exceed all beleefe.

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