0 ag贵宾会下载手机版-APP安装下载

ag贵宾会下载手机版 注册最新版下载

ag贵宾会下载手机版 注册

ag贵宾会下载手机版注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:郑国全 大小:EYkpGIxP34751KB 下载:LC1pfSUI82162次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:sOfXXKzP82407条
日期:2020-08-06 01:30:13
安卓
李念觉

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "You are always taking something of that sort into your head,"replied Minerva, "and that is why I cannot desert you in yourafflictions; you are so plausible, shrewd and shifty. Any one butyourself on returning from so long a voyage would at once have gonehome to see his wife and children, but you do not seem to care aboutasking after them or hearing any news about them till you haveexploited your wife, who remains at home vainly grieving for you,and having no peace night or day for the tears she sheds on yourbehalf. As for my not coming near you, I was never uneasy about you,for I was certain you would get back safely though you would loseall your men, and I did not wish to quarrel with my uncle Neptune, whonever forgave you for having blinded his son. I will now, however,point out to you the lie of the land, and you will then perhapsbelieve me. This is the haven of the old merman Phorcys, and here isthe olive tree that grows at the head of it; [near it is the cavesacred to the Naiads;] here too is the overarching cavern in which youhave offered many an acceptable hecatomb to the nymphs, and this isthe wooded mountain Neritum."
2.  "It was day-break by the time she had done speaking, so shedressed me in my shirt and cloak. As for herself she threw a beautifullight gossamer fabric over her shoulders, fastening it with a goldengirdle round her waist, and she covered her head with a mantle. Then Iwent about among the men everywhere all over the house, and spokekindly to each of them man by man: 'You must not lie sleeping here anylonger,' said I to them, 'we must be going, for Circe has told meall about it.' And this they did as I bade them.
3.  "Ulysses," said he, "now that you have reached my house I doubtnot you will get home without further misadventure no matter howmuch you have suffered in the past. To you others, however, who comehere night after night to drink my choicest wine and listen to mybard, I would insist as follows. Our guest has already packed up theclothes, wrought gold, and other valuables which you have broughtfor his acceptance; let us now, therefore, present him further, eachone of us, with a large tripod and a cauldron. We will recoupourselves by the levy of a general rate; for private individualscannot be expected to bear the burden of such a handsome present."
4.  "Son of Atreus," it said, "we used to say that Jove had loved youbetter from first to last than any other hero, for you were captainover many and brave men, when we were all fighting together beforeTroy; yet the hand of death, which no mortal can escape, was laid uponyou all too early. Better for you had you fallen at Troy in thehey-day of your renown, for the Achaeans would have built a mound overyour ashes, and your son would have been heir to your good name,whereas it has now been your lot to come to a most miserable end."
5.  "Wife," said he, turning to Queen Arete, "Go, fetch the best chestwe have, and put a clean cloak and shirt in it. Also, set a copperon the fire and heat some water; our guest will take a warm bath;see also to the careful packing of the presents that the noblePhaeacians have made him; he will thus better enjoy both his supperand the singing that will follow. I shall myself give him thisgolden goblet- which is of exquisite workmanship- that he may bereminded of me for the rest of his life whenever he makes adrink-offering to Jove, or to any of the gods."
6.  "We lit a fire, offered some of the cheeses in sacrifice, ate othersof them, and then sat waiting till the Cyclops should come in with hissheep. When he came, he brought in with him a huge load of dryfirewood to light the fire for his supper, and this he flung with sucha noise on to the floor of his cave that we hid ourselves for fearat the far end of the cavern. Meanwhile he drove all the ewesinside, as well as the she-goats that he was going to milk, leavingthe males, both rams and he-goats, outside in the yards. Then herolled a huge stone to the mouth of the cave- so huge that two andtwenty strong four-wheeled waggons would not be enough to draw it fromits place against the doorway. When he had so done he sat down andmilked his ewes and goats, all in due course, and then let each ofthem have her own young. He curdled half the milk and set it asidein wicker strainers, but the other half he poured into bowls that hemight drink it for his supper. When he had got through with all hiswork, he lit the fire, and then caught sight of us, whereon he said:

计划指导

1.  "Be off, old man," he cried, "from the doorway, or you shall bedragged out neck and heels. Do you not see that they are all giving methe wink, and wanting me to turn you out by force, only I do notlike to do so? Get up then, and go of yourself, or we shall come toblows."
2.  They left their sports as he told them, and when they were withinthe house, they laid their cloaks on the benches and seats inside, andthen sacrificed some sheep, goats, pigs, and a heifer, all of them fatand well grown. Thus they made ready for their meal. In the meantimeUlysses and the swineherd were about starting for the town, and theswineherd said, "Stranger, I suppose you still want to go to townto-day, as my master said you were to do; for my own part I shouldhave liked you to stay here as a station hand, but I must do as mymaster tells me, or he will scold me later on, and a scolding fromone's master is a very serious thing. Let us then be off, for it isnow broad day; it will be night again directly and then you willfind it colder."
3.  "I lent it him," answered Noemon, "what else could I do when a manof his position said he was in a difficulty, and asked me to obligehim? I could not possibly refuse. As for those who went with himthey were the best young men we have, and I saw Mentor go on boardas captain- or some god who was exactly like him. I cannotunderstand it, for I saw Mentor here myself yesterday morning, and yethe was then setting out for Pylos."
4.  They gathered round the ghost of the son of Peleus, and the ghost ofAgamemnon joined them, sorrowing bitterly. Round him were gatheredalso the ghosts of those who had perished with him in the house ofAeisthus; and the ghost of Achilles spoke first.
5.  A servant presently led in the famous bard Demodocus, whom themuse had dearly loved, but to whom she had given both good and evil,for though she had endowed him with a divine gift of song, she hadrobbed him of his eyesight. Pontonous set a seat for him among theguests, leaning it up against a bearing-post. He hung the lyre for himon a peg over his head, and showed him where he was to feel for itwith his hands. He also set a fair table with a basket of victualsby his side, and a cup of wine from which he might drink whenever hewas so disposed.
6.  "'Your brother and his ships escaped, for Juno protected him, butwhen he was just about to reach the high promontory of Malea, he wascaught by a heavy gale which carried him out to sea again sorelyagainst his will, and drove him to the foreland where Thyestes used todwell, but where Aegisthus was then living. By and by, however, itseemed as though he was to return safely after all, for the godsbacked the wind into its old quarter and they reached home; whereonAgamemnon kissed his native soil, and shed tears of joy at findinghimself in his own country.

推荐功能

1.  He counted his goodly coppers and cauldrons, his gold and all hisclothes, but there was nothing missing; still he kept grieving aboutnot being in his own country, and wandered up and down by the shore ofthe sounding sea bewailing his hard fate. Then Minerva came up tohim disguised as a young shepherd of delicate and princely mien,with a good cloak folded double about her shoulders; she had sandalson her comely feet and held a javelin in her hand. Ulysses was gladwhen he saw her, and went straight up to her.
2.  And Piraeus answered, "Telemachus, you may stay away as long asyou please, but I will look after him for you, and he shall find nolack of hospitality."
3.  On this, as he passed, he gave Ulysses a kick on the hip out of purewantonness, but Ulysses stood firm, and did not budge from the path.For a moment he doubted whether or no to fly at Melanthius and killhim with his staff, or fling him to the ground and beat his brainsout; he resolved, however, to endure it and keep himself in check, butthe swineherd looked straight at Melanthius and rebuked him, liftingup his hands and praying to heaven as he did so.
4.  "Thus, then, did we sit and hold sad talk with one another, I on theone side of the trench with my sword held over the blood, and theghost of my comrade saying all this to me from the other side. Thencame the ghost of my dead mother Anticlea, daughter to Autolycus. Ihad left her alive when I set out for Troy and was moved to tears whenI saw her, but even so, for all my sorrow I would not let her comenear the blood till I had asked my questions of Teiresias.
5.   As he spoke he kissed his son, and a tear fell from his cheek onto the ground, for he had restrained all tears till now. butTelemachus could not yet believe that it was his father, and said:
6.  As he spoke he cut off the first piece and offered it as a burntsacrifice to the immortal gods; then he made them a drink-offering,put the cup in the hands of Ulysses, and sat down to his ownportion. Mesaulius brought them their bread; the swineherd hadbought this man on his own account from among the Taphians duringhis master's absence, and had paid for him with his own moneywithout saying anything either to his mistress or Laertes. They thenlaid their hands upon the good things that were before them, andwhen they had had enough to eat and drink, Mesaulius took away whatwas left of the bread, and they all went to bed after having made ahearty supper.

应用

1.  To this Telemachus answered, "Father, I have always heard of yourrenown both in the field and in council, but the task you talk of is avery great one: I am awed at the mere thought of it; two men cannotstand against many and brave ones. There are not ten suitors only, nortwice ten, but ten many times over; you shall learn their number atonce. There are fifty-two chosen youths from Dulichium, and theyhave six servants; from Same there are twenty-four; twenty youngAchaeans from Zacynthus, and twelve from Ithaca itself, all of themwell born. They have with them a servant Medon, a bard, and two menwho can carve at table. If we face such numbers as this, you mayhave bitter cause to rue your coming, and your revenge. See whetheryou cannot think of some one who would be willing to come and helpus."
2.  On this, as he passed, he gave Ulysses a kick on the hip out of purewantonness, but Ulysses stood firm, and did not budge from the path.For a moment he doubted whether or no to fly at Melanthius and killhim with his staff, or fling him to the ground and beat his brainsout; he resolved, however, to endure it and keep himself in check, butthe swineherd looked straight at Melanthius and rebuked him, liftingup his hands and praying to heaven as he did so.
3.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Poor unhappy stranger, Ihave found the story of your misfortunes extremely interesting, butthat part about Ulysses is not right; and you will never get me tobelieve it. Why should a man like you go about telling lies in thisway? I know all about the return of my master. The gods one and all ofthem detest him, or they would have taken him before Troy, or lethim die with friends around him when the days of his fighting weredone; for then the Achaeans would have built a mound over his ashesand his son would have been heir to his renown, but now the stormwinds have spirited him away we know not whither.
4、  "Thus did we converse, and anon Proserpine sent up the ghosts of thewives and daughters of all the most famous men. They gathered incrowds about the blood, and I considered how I might question themseverally. In the end I deemed that it would be best to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh, and keep them from alldrinking the blood at once. So they came up one after the other, andeach one as I questioned her told me her race and lineage.
5、  "'When you have reached this spot, as I now tell you, dig a trench acubit or so in length, breadth, and depth, and pour into it as adrink-offering to all the dead, first, honey mixed with milk, thenwine, and in the third place water-sprinkling white barley meal overthe whole. Moreover you must offer many prayers to the poor feebleghosts, and promise them that when you get back to Ithaca you willsacrifice a barren heifer to them, the best you have, and will loadthe pyre with good things. More particularly you must promise thatTeiresias shall have a black sheep all to himself, the finest in allyour flocks.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(9tbtyMUg33182))

  • 杨绍普 08-05

      "I am afraid of the gossip and scandal that may be set on footagainst me later on; for the people here are very ill-natured, andsome low fellow, if he met us, might say, 'Who is this fine-lookingstranger that is going about with Nausicaa? Where did she End him? Isuppose she is going to marry him. Perhaps he is a vagabond sailorwhom she has taken from some foreign vessel, for we have noneighbours; or some god has at last come down from heaven in answer toher prayers, and she is going to live with him all the rest of herlife. It would be a good thing if she would take herself of I for shand find a husband somewhere else, for she will not look at one of themany excellent young Phaeacians who are in with her.' This is the kindof disparaging remark that would be made about me, and I could notcomplain, for I should myself be scandalized at seeing any othergirl do the like, and go about with men in spite of everybody, whileher father and mother were still alive, and without having beenmarried in the face of all the world.

  • 魏昊辰 08-05

      "Telemachus, insolent braggart that you are, how dare you try tothrow the blame upon us suitors? It is your mother's fault not ours,for she is a very artful woman. This three years past, and close onfour, she has been driving us out of our minds, by encouraging eachone of us, and sending him messages without meaning one word of whatshe says. And then there was that other trick she played us. She setup a great tambour frame in her room, and began to work on an enormouspiece of fine needlework. 'Sweet hearts,' said she, 'Ulysses is indeeddead, still do not press me to marry again immediately, wait- for Iwould not have skill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I havecompleted a pall for the hero Laertes, to be in readiness againstthe time when death shall take him. He is very rich, and the womenof the place will talk if he is laid out without a pall.'

  • 韩正 08-05

       "I wish it may prove so," answered Telemachus. "If it does, I willshow you so much good will and give you so many presents that allwho meet you will congratulate you."

  • 李琳琳 08-05

      And Minerva answered, "I will tell you truly and particularly allabout it. I am Mentes, son of Anchialus, and I am King of theTaphians. I have come here with my ship and crew, on a voyage to menof a foreign tongue being bound for Temesa with a cargo of iron, and Ishall bring back copper. As for my ship, it lies over yonder off theopen country away from the town, in the harbour Rheithron under thewooded mountain Neritum. Our fathers were friends before us, as oldLaertes will tell you, if you will go and ask him. They say,however, that he never comes to town now, and lives by himself inthe country, faring hardly, with an old woman to look after him andget his dinner for him, when he comes in tired from pottering abouthis vineyard. They told me your father was at home again, and that waswhy I came, but it seems the gods are still keeping him back, for heis not dead yet not on the mainland. It is more likely he is on somesea-girt island in mid ocean, or a prisoner among savages who aredetaining him against his will I am no prophet, and know very littleabout omens, but I speak as it is borne in upon me from heaven, andassure you that he will not be away much longer; for he is a man ofsuch resource that even though he were in chains of iron he would findsome means of getting home again. But tell me, and tell me true, canUlysses really have such a fine looking fellow for a son? You areindeed wonderfully like him about the head and eyes, for we were closefriends before he set sail for Troy where the flower of all theArgives went also. Since that time we have never either of us seen theother."

  • 高龙福 08-04

    {  Thereon he floated about for two nights and two days in the water,with a heavy swell on the sea and death staring him in the face; butwhen the third day broke, the wind fell and there was a dead calmwithout so much as a breath of air stirring. As he rose on the swellhe looked eagerly ahead, and could see land quite near. Then, aschildren rejoice when their dear father begins to get better afterhaving for a long time borne sore affliction sent him by some angryspirit, but the gods deliver him from evil, so was Ulysses thankfulwhen he again saw land and trees, and swam on with all his strengththat he might once more set foot upon dry ground. When, however, hegot within earshot, he began to hear the surf thundering up againstthe rocks, for the swell still broke against them with a terrificroar. Everything was enveloped in spray; there were no harbourswhere a ship might ride, nor shelter of any kind, but onlyheadlands, low-lying rocks, and mountain tops.

  • 黄毛 08-03

      "Eumaeus, I hear footsteps; I suppose one of your men or some one ofyour acquaintance is coming here, for the dogs are fawning urn him andnot barking."}

  • 吴传明 08-03

      Then Penelope resolved that she would show herself to the suitors.She knew of the plot against Telemachus, for the servant Medon hadoverheard their counsels and had told her; she went down thereforeto the court attended by her maidens, and when she reached the suitorsshe stood by one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of thecloister holding a veil before her face, and rebuked Antinous saying:

  • 赵义亮 08-03

      "'You will want no guide,' she answered; 'raise you mast, set yourwhite sails, sit quite still, and the North Wind will blow you thereof itself. When your ship has traversed the waters of Oceanus, youwill reach the fertile shore of Proserpine's country with its grovesof tall poplars and willows that shed their fruit untimely; here beachyour ship upon the shore of Oceanus, and go straight on to the darkabode of Hades. You will find it near the place where the riversPyriphlegethon and Cocytus (which is a branch of the river Styx)flow into Acheron, and you will see a rock near it, just where the tworoaring rivers run into one another.

  • 李清 08-02

       Then he sat down on the hearth among the ashes and they all heldtheir peace, till presently the old hero Echeneus, who was anexcellent speaker and an elder among the Phaeacians, plainly and inall honesty addressed them thus:

  • 尧舜禹 07-31

    {  "When at last we got to the island where we had left the rest of ourships, we found our comrades lamenting us, and anxiously awaitingour return. We ran our vessel upon the sands and got out of her onto the sea shore; we also landed the Cyclops' sheep, and dividedthem equitably amongst us so that none might have reason tocomplain. As for the ram, my companions agreed that I should have itas an extra share; so I sacrificed it on the sea shore, and burned itsthigh bones to Jove, who is the lord of all. But he heeded not mysacrifice, and only thought how he might destroy my ships and mycomrades.

  • 彭隆荣 07-31

      When they had done praying and sprinkling the barley mealThrasymedes dealt his blow, and brought the heifer down with astroke that cut through the tendons at the base of her neck, whereonthe daughters and daughters-in-law of Nestor, and his venerable wifeEurydice (she was eldest daughter to Clymenus) screamed withdelight. Then they lifted the heifer's head from off the ground, andPisistratus cut her throat. When she had done bleeding and was quitedead, they cut her up. They cut out the thigh bones all in due course,wrapped them round in two layers of fat, and set some pieces of rawmeat on the top of them; then Nestor laid them upon the wood fireand poured wine over them, while the young men stood near him withfive-pronged spits in their hands. When the thighs were burned andthey had tasted the inward meats, they cut the rest of the meat upsmall, put the pieces on the spits and toasted them over the fire.

提交评论